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    If you’re looking to make your leather work look a little classier, one of the easiest ways to do it is by adding padding.

    Think of the watches you own or have seen that have a leather strap. Those straps will either be flat and made up of two pieces of leather glued together, or padded made up of two pieces of leather stitched around a thinner piece of leather, creating a raised looked in the middle. Almost always, the padded strap will look more refined.

    This leather mouse pad is an excellent way to figure out how to add padding for the first time. And, what’s more, you’ll end up with a classy leather mouse pad to keep or give someone as a gift.

    As always, if you don't feel skilled enough to pull off any of the steps below, you can check out this beginners guide to get you going.

    What You Need:

    • 5oz piece of scrap leather
    • 3oz piece of scrap leather 
    • 3oz piece of quality leather (this is what will be placed on top)
    • Leather glue
    • Brown edge paint
    • 400 grit sand paper
    • Binder clips
    • General leather working tools, such as: 
    •        Leather working knife
    •        Edge paint applicator (a roller or applicator rod will work)
    •        Bone folder
    •        Diamond chisels
    •        Needle and thread
    •        Divider
    •        Ruler
    •        Rubber hammer
    •        Scratch Awl

    Step

    First you'll need to trace and cut out the leather.

    Making sure that you have the right measurements for each piece is probably the most tricky part. For this project, the mouse pad I made measures 9.5” squared.

    For each piece of the project, I first trace it out using a scratch awl and then cut it out using a solid ruler that won’t slide around and a sharp knife that will easily make clean cuts. 

    Start with the 5oz piece of scrap leather. This will be the thickest and most firm piece of leather, which makes a perfect base for your project. Since it is the base, just cut it to the exact size you want your mouse pad to be. For me, this was 9.5” x 9.5” 

    Once you’ve cut out this piece you’ll need to round out the corners as well. To do this I use a 1” washer and trace around it’s edge in each corner. Then cut it out with a leather working knife. There’s multiple ways to cut out a rounded edges and you can check them out here.

    After that, you’ll need to cut out the padding layer from the 3oz scrap. You always want to set the padding in just about as far your stitching will be. I set the stitching at 3/16” so the padding that I cut out was 9 5/16” x 9 5/16”.

    Once this piece is cut out you’ll need to round the corners out. Use the previous method to round out these edges, but use a .5” washer (or quarter) this time. 

    Finally, you’ll want to cut out the top layer from a nice piece of leather. This piece of leather will be set on top and stretched over the two previous layers. It’s really difficult to figure out the exact measurements needed to adequately cover the other layers, so I always cut this one to be too large and then go back and trim it. For this project, the top layer I cut out was measured 11.5” x 11.5”. You don’t need to round out these corners yet because this piece will be trimmed later.

    Step

    Second, you'll want to glue the three separate layers together.

    Because you want to top layer to be formed to the bottom two, you need to glue the bottom two layers first.

    Take the 5oz scrap piece and the 3oz piece of scrap and glue them together, applying glue to both surfaces and making sure that the 3oz piece is centered.

    After giving the glue about 30 minutes to dry, begin attaching the top piece of leather. The leather I used was very stretchy. To make sure that it stretched smoothly, I glued one edge first, let it dry, and then glued the rest. This gave me the opportunity to stretch it tightly. If your leather is a bit firmer, you can just glue the whole thing on top all at once.

    Once the top piece is in place use the bone folder and to form it around the padding. To do this, all you need to do is press the bone folder firmly into the top piece of leather in the dip created by the padding along the edges. If your leather is not staying as you do this, you can lightly wet the surface of the leather with water to aid the process. I then add binder clips to keep the edges down while the glue dries. Be careful though. If you are using a firmer leather, binder clips may leave an indent. If you're worried about this happening, just place a cloth around the leather and then put the binder clips on.

    Again, allow about 30 minutes for the glue to dry and then flip the project upside-down and trim the excess from the top layer.

    Step

    Now that the top layer has been trimmed, you can start stitching. Mark your stitching lines around the entire mouse pad by using a divider set to 3/16”. The divider should sit in the dip made by the padding.

    Once these lines have been marked, use the diamond chisels to make the stitching holes. When punching out the holes, make sure that the chisel is perfectly perpendicular to the leather. If it is not kept at 90° the stitching on the back side of the project will turn out ugly.

    Finally, when you get to the curves, work your way around them with a two pronged chisel.

    Stitching itself is a little tricky to teach through text. So check out this video to learn how to saddle stitch leather.

    Once you've finished the stitching line, be sure to backstitch. To backstitch, simply stitch in the opposite direction once you've got the the end of your stitching line, for two or three holes. Then, trim the thread, burn the end, and tuck that lose end into the stitching hole.

    Step

    Typically I like to burnish edges. This is a way to finish edges using friction to essentially melt the loose fibers together. That said, stretchy or supple leathers don’t burnish well. In cases where the edges to a project won’t burnish, you have two options: turn the edges or use edge paint. For this project it made more sense to paint the edges and painting edges is a typical method used when wanting to create a ‘fine’ leather working project.

    When burnishing, you start of sanding, but you don’t need to sand the edges prior to burnishing, in fact it will create a worse end result.

    Instead, start by applying a layer of edge paint. You can apply with a flat applicator rod or a rolling edge paint applicator. To do this, just dip the applicator into the edge paint and carefully set it on the entire edge of the project. The first layer is just about covering it and establishing a base layer. You don’t have to put on a lot, just enough to cover it. If the paint spills over the edge be sure to quickly wipe it away with a paper towel.

    Allow the first layer to dry and then apply a second layer. Be more generous about applying the edge paint on this layer. You should be creating a nice smooth bubble of paint on the edge as you go.

    Once this layer has dried, take sand paper and even the edge out. The purpose of this step is to make sure the edge is completely smooth, even if you have to sand back down to the leather, however, if you've cut the edges evenly this shouldn’t be necessary.

    Apply one final layer of edge paint and let it dry. Then, lightly sand out any imperfections. If this edge painting process is new to you or you need a little more explanation, you can find a more detailed guide here.

    To finish the edges, and the project, apply a bit of beeswax by rubbing a block of beeswax along the edges, and finally buff it out with a canvas cloth.

    And that’s it! Enjoy your new mouse pad and new found skill that will add a ton of class to any leather project you want to apply it to. 

     


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    Most of the time, the whole point of going on a hike or camping trip is to get away from technology. We couldn't agree more. But the truth is, most of us still carry our smart phones for emergency calls, wayfinding, and camera possibilities, all in a single package. Our vote? Turn off the email and the Twitter alerts, and take advantage of the way your phone can enhance your trip. Just make sure your protect it from the weather. 

     

    1. Sky Guide: This is my favorite app on this list, because it enhances my favorite part of backpacking - getting out away from city lights to where the sky opens up and all of its features become visible. Simply hold it up to the sky, day or night, to find constellations, planets, satellites, and stars by location. There's also the freeware Night Sky, but the $3 for the quality provided by Skyguide might be the best value in the app store.  Find it on the App Store

     

    2. Maps.me: My go-to offline map app; meaning - you can download a map for a region and use it even when you're not connected to a data network. (Which, if you're doing things right, you probably won't be.)  App Store or Android

     

    3. An Offline Survival App: For those emergency situations, it's great to have a little guidance on how to stay safe. For iPhone users, we recommend Survive it! - Wilderness Survival Manual, a free, simple to search collection of proven tips. For Android, the Offline Survival Manual seems to be its best peer. 

     

    4. Snapseed: Trying to capture the amazing vistas and scenery from a hike can be tough on a smartphone. Your eyes take in all this information, but what your phone can record pales in comparison. A little editing can help, and this is the most versatile, freeware photo editing app we know of. It's incredibly powerful, and the fact that you can shoot, produce these results, and share all on the same device is simply amazing. App Store and Android

     

    5. Knots 3D: All of us knew we knew more about knot-tying and rope work. Knots 3D not only helps you determine the best knot for the task, but offers incredible step-by-step tutorials to get there. There's a freeware, ad-supported version, as well as a $2.00 premium option. Our opinion: worth it for the upgrade. App Store and Android

     

    6. Viewranger Skyline: Augmented reality at its best. This app uses your phone's camera and overlay GPS information to help you identify geological features like peaks and summits, as well as other key locations and pathfinding information. App Store and Android

     

    7. REI - National Parks Guide & Maps: A relatively new option from the national outdoor retailer. It doesn't have every park yet, but they're certain to be added soon. We haven't played with it much yet, but will certainly be putting it to the test on our adventures this summer. App Store and Android

     

     


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    created at: 05/24/2016

    Turning out perfectly grilled foods in your own backyard requires balancing two important variables: time and temperature. Too hot, and the food gets overly blackened and burnt before it's cooked through. Too short, and the surfaces don't have enough time to caramelize, brown, and develop that characteristic charred flavor that makes grilling worth the effort in the first place.

    A solid grill thermometer can help, but here's the bad news: standard bi-metal dial thermometers, the kind present in almost all backyard grills and smokers, can be off by as much as 75° F in either direction. Which, if you're going for low and slow cooked flavors of barbecue, is enough to totally ruin your meal and your day. Here's how to fix it. 

    First, a note: obviously, there are a wide variety of thermometer types in a wide variety of grills. All might not be adjustable in the same way, or adjustable at all, but if yours is made by one of the larger manufacturers, it's likely designed to be calibrated. Give it a shot!

    created at: 05/24/2016

    1. Open the lid and remove the thermometer entirely. Yours might be attached with a spring clamp, a threaded rod and nut, or even attached with Phillips-headed bolts. 

    created at: 05/24/2016

    2. Check out your thermometer, and look on the back for a piece of hardware, likely a thin hex nut. Grab a wrench, either adjustable or an open-ended or combination wrench that fits. (Mine happened to be 16mm). And when we say "wrench," we meant it. Do NOT use pliers, Vise Grips, or Channellocks; they're too coarse for this work, and you can damage the hardware and possibly ruin your thermometer. 

    created at: 05/24/2016

    3. Now, we need a consistent source of temperature to gauge the reading. On a smaller, instant-read thermometer (like one designed to temp meats from 0-200°F), you can use a glass full of ice water, stirred well, which will be as close to 32°F/0° C as you can get. Since a grill thermometer has no reason to read that low, we'll look at the other end of the spectrum: boiling water.

    At sea level, water boils at 212°F or 100° C. I'm only at 73 ft above sea level, so that's good enough for me. Those of you that live at elevation will likely already know how to adjust accordingly, so just be aware.

    So, bring the water to a full rolling boil for a couple minutes, and the temp will never climb higher than 212°F. Perfect.

    created at: 05/24/2016

    4. Take your initial reading. At first, ours read at 235° F, which means I've been regularly been way under my target smoking temperatures, cooking closer 200° rather than my intended 225°. No wonder my food always takes so much longer than recipes suggest to reach the desired internal temperature.

    So now, use the wrench to adjust the temperature until it's as close to 212°F/100°C as possible. Use the Celsius scale if you have one, since the tick mark will be right on 100°. If not, 210° will be close enough for this decidedly non-laboratory setting.

    created at: 05/24/2016

    Make little changes, like 1/16th turns at a time. You're basically adjusting the radial origin point of the needle, so a little movement at the center means a larger change at the outside of the circle. 

     

    created at: 05/24/2016

    There you go. Mark your calendars to repeat every Memorial Day, or before any big parties or special cooks. Enjoy, and get outside and start grilling!

     

     


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     These are thoughts, the artwork, the news stories, the tools, the food, the conversations, and whatever else we just can't get out of our heads this month.     

    1. The Book: Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic by Sam Quinones

    I've been lucky lately. At least once or twice a year, I happen across a book that completely blows me away. A book that hits me at the right time, moves me like the best literature can, and has me trying to finish my work early so I can get back to the story.

    Dreamland is the first piece of non-fiction to ever do that to me. It reads like a great crime novel - multiple narrators, no good guys/no bad guys, moves through 20 years of history, and provides just enough detail to keep you engaged. And, it affected me personally - the book is based in several geographic locations I know intimately: the area around Portsmouth, Ohio and the Ohio River valley, three hours from where I grew up. I used to drive-by these very neighborhoods and stores they mention when visiting my college girlfriend's family. Columbus, Ohio, where I went to graduate school, becomes the launching pad for selling Mexican black tar heroin to prescription painkiller addicts. I've traveled to Nayarit, Mexico, and now live in Portland, Oregon, two other major epicenters of the narrative. I know people devastated by opiate use; we all do. 

    I will also admit: I feel an enormous amount of sympathy for folks who get caught up in opiate use. I'm not a drug guy; I've never had an experience I'd want to repeat with THC, and I don't think I'm really wired that way. But I have had some surgeries and injuries in my life where I've been given prescription painkillers, and I find the experience extremely pleasant. So, I can imagine what it's like to want to feel that way all the time, especially if you're struggling to find work, or are in severe pain. The opiate epidemic strikes me as a true tragedy, with real victims and heartbreak.

    This book is *&#%ing amazing. Go read it. 

    2. The Social Network: Instagram

    At this point, it's basically the only one of these I use anymore. But for the last few weeks, I've been super into it. I spent some time finding new feeds to follow and letting go of some stale ones, and it's become a great source of inspiration for me again. It's the thing I do while waiting in line at the bank or for my water to boil, and I've been doing my best to post more myself. Are you on Instagram?  If so, come find me and we'll hang out there. 

     

    3. The Vintage Photography: Soviet Photo

    I'm completely inspired by this collection of images from the Moscow-based magazine Советское фото: Soviet Photo.  From the page description, "Although its publication schedule was at times irregular, Sovetskoe foto was an illustrated monthly featuring editorials, letters, articles, and photographic essays alongside advertisements for photography, photographic processes, and photographic chemicals and equipment. It primarily addressed a domestic audience of Soviet amateur photographers and photo clubs, yet it also featured the works of international and professional photographers, such as Semyon Fridlyand." 

     

    4. The Mind-Blowing New Way of Looking at Things: This Map.

    Tokyo-based desinger Hajime Narukawa created the AuthaGraph, a completely new way of dissecting the globe into a flat 2D representation. It's disorienting, sure, but, as an example, look at a traditional map and check out, say, Iceland's connection to the rest of the Nordic countries. Even though the top of the map splits here, you can see how close these things actually are.

    5. The TV Show: None.

    In fact, I've had a couple duds lately. Started stuff and haven't wanted to finish them, or did so begrudgingly. What do you recommend? 

    6. The Song: A Fool Such as I 

    This one is a country standard, and has been recorded by dozens, including Bob Dylan, Elvis Presley, and Willie Nelson. It's less that I've been listening to this Hank Snow version and more that this is the song I find myself picking (almost) every time I pick up a guitar to fiddle around. It's really a quite nice melody, and it's worked its way into my bones. 

     

    7. The Concentration App: Noisli 

    I'm a big fan of using consistent noise to aid productivity (and sleep!). I'd been using a variety of YouTube videos on loop and some rain apps on my phone for a few years, but I discovered the Noisli app a few months ago, and I'm totally hooked. This helps even out office chatter or traffic or coffee shop music like a boss, and being able to change the sliders and add a little more in as they day progresses helps keep things interesting. 

     

    8. The Snack: Popcorn. 

    It is literally the perfect food. I'll never get sick of it. 

     

     

    What are you totally obsessed with this month? Tell us all about it in the comments below. 

     

     


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    Cowboy StewThere is nothing like a long day of hiking or horseback riding to get you in the mood for some good, hearty eating. And so the American West's roving cattlemen and cross-country venturers created a long tradition of fantastic, simple meals meant to fill you up on the trail. So bust out that cast iron skillet and prepare yourself for some authentic cowboy eating.   

    BUFFALO STEW

    Buffalo meat was originally a large part of the American West that eventually passed out of favor as the lust for buffalo hides wreaked havoc on the population. Now, thanks to the breeding efforts of American conservationists, bison (and bison burgers, etc.) have had an incredible resurgence in modern America. This classic, simple recipe must be tried.

     

    • 1 stalk of celery, diced
    • 1 onion, diced
    • 2-3 carrots, diced
    • 1 can stewed tomatoes
    • 2 lbs buffalo meat, cut into 1" cubes
    • 1 gallon water, or mixture of broth and water
    • 2 lbs waxy red potatoes (not russets)
    • 1 cup barely

     

    Use a Dutch oven or a cast iron skillet + oven safe stock pot.
    Brown the meat until seared, about 3 minutes. Add onions and carrots and cook for 5 minutes more. Transfer to a stew pot or Dutch oven, and add water, potatoes, celery, stewed tomatoes, and barley, cook an additional 5 minutes. Place the pan, covered, in a 400° oven and bake under barley is tender, about 30 minutes.

     

    HARDTACK

    HardtackI know, I know, modern crackers have come a long way since hardtack, but you can't have a list of cowboy recipes without including it. Probably the most recognizable staple of the Old West, hardtack is the food that crops up in nearly every pulp novel or historical textbook – but I think very few modern men have ever tried it. From what I understand, it's flavor can be...um, quite the test of manhood. Below is a simple recipe calibrated for an oven, although here is a more extensive recipe from Wikihow.com

    Ingredients: 2 cups flour, 1 cup water

    Combine the flour and water, and knead until smooth. Roll the dough flat until  1/4" thick. Cut biscuits with a drinking glass or biscuit cutter, or slice into 2 x 4" rectangles. Poke holes into each biscuit with a fork. Place on two cast iron skillets (or halve and repeat) and sprinkle with salt. Bake at 400° F for 30-40 minutes, until very hard and dry. Enjoy (?)

     

    SOURDOUGH CORNBREAD

    Sourdough biscuits were a solid step up from the hardtack situation and are still a huge part of modern American cuisine in certain areas. This recipe (as well as the link for sourdough starter) is from an 1800's newspaper and reprinted here.

    • 1 cup starter.
    • Enough cornmeal to make a beatable batter
    • 1 ½ cups milk
    • 2 tablespoons sugar
    • 2 eggs beaten
    • ¼ cup warm melted butter, or fat
    • ½ teaspoon salt
    • ½ teaspoon baking soda

    Mix starter, cornmeal, milk, eggs and stir thoroughly in large bowl. Stir in melted butter, salt and soda. Pour into a 10 inch greased frying pan or Dutch oven, and bake for 25 to 30 minutes.

     

    SONOFABITCH STEW

    Sonofabitch StewSonofabitch Stew (also known as rascal stew, sonofagun stew) is perhaps the most unique staple of the cowboy heyday. Comprised of a whole bunch of meat cuts we rarely eat today, it was a supposedly a very tasty dish. The necessary "marrow gut" – the passage between stomachs leading to the abomasum– was only to be taken from a young calf that had yet to be weaned and was considered one of the key ingredients that gave the stew its famously delicious flavor. The stew was also briefly called Cleveland Stew in dishonor of President Grover Cleveland's displacement of cowboys in the Cherokee Strip. The following recipe is from Art of Manliness, although there are a number of variations on the internet. 

    • 2 pounds of lean beef
    • Half a calf heart
    • 1 ½ pounds of calf liver
    • 1 set sweetbreads (that’s the thymus gland for you city slickers)
    • 1 set of brains
    • 1 set of marrow gut
    • Salt, pepper to taste
    • Louisiana hot sauce

    Visit the Art of Manliness to see how to bring the stew together. Hint: it involves a lot of simmering. 


    FRIED CAMP APPLES

    created at: 11/02/2014Every hearty meal on the trail deserves a quality desert, and these fried apples are a fantastic way to end the evening. 

    Ingredients: apples,  lard or bacon drippings, brown sugar, ground cinnamon,

    Slice the apples horizontally - peel, core, and all - about 1/2" inch thick.  Heat a layer of drippings in a cast iron skillet,  and add the apples in a single layer, turning frequently until golden brown but not completely stewed.  Serve hot, sprinkled with sugar and cinnamon. And since you're not on the range, some vanilla ice cream is nice. 

     

    HONORABLE MENTION: The Old Confederacy Receipt Book of 1863.

    Confederate Receipt Book

    If you're interested in the cross-section of history and cooking, this document is an incredible find. Hidden gems abound, like this slapjack recipe (Take flour, little sugar and water, mix with or without a little yeast, the latter better if at hand, mix into paste, and fry the same as fritters in clean fat) or this sure-fire headache remedy (One teaspoonful of pulverized charcoal and one-third of a teaspoonful of soda mixed in very warm water). Also included are step-by-step instructions for candlemaking/soapmaking, beer brewing, and "fire balls for fuel" -making. 

     


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    created at: 02/03/2015
    I always like a tool whose name indicates its purpose. Oh, what's a screwdriver do? A citrus squeezer? How about a box cutter? The function is all right there in the name. 

    In many ways, a speed square falls right into the category. It tells helps you determine "square" - that is, when one edge or line is exactly 90° to another, and it helps you do it quickly. Done. Right? Wrong. 

    created at: 02/03/2015

    Well, actually, yes, but, wait! There's more. 

    A speed square is a carpenter's tool rather than a fine woodworking tool, which means its intended for quick and reliable marking of butt and miter joint lines, rather than precision layout of parts for furniture. And, in this case, that's a good thing: cause, combined with a tape measure, this will help you break down dimensional or "two-by" lumber in no time. When using a marking knife, I'll reach for a try or combination square; but anytime I'm using a pencil, the speed square is the way to go. 

    Since it's a solid piece of metal with no joints or moving parts, a speed square can be used as a try square and a miter square, or, a simple way of marking 90° and 45°, due to the long fence that runs along one side. It protrudes on either side, allowing the square to be flipped and used on any edge. 

     

    created at: 02/03/2015One of my favorite uses for the speed square is to scribe long lines parallel to the edge of a piece of plywood or solid wood, as for a rip cut. There are notches spaced every 1/4" on the inside of the square, allowing you to place a pencil in the notch, butt the fence firmly against and edge, and scribe a long straight line along the grain.

     

    created at: 02/03/2015

    When making crosscuts along shorter widths of stock, a speed square makes a great fence with which to guide a hand held circular saw. Just use the square to mark the cut line, and then a guide line the same distance of the blade to the shoe plate's edge. If making a rip cut, use the scribing technique above. 

    The speed square includes common angles for roofs, stairways, and decks, noted by the Hip - Val (hip and valley rafters) scale. That can take some practice to learn, and specific jobs to use. But along the hypotenuse edge lies a relatively accurate - and super fast - protractor: a way to read and mark angles.

    It works like this. Find the pivot edge (the right angle) and hold it up to one side. On the opposite edge, find your angle, and align it to the same edge. The long side of the triangle - the hypotenuse - now crosses your project at your desired angle.

    So, as an example, let's say you want to scribe a 20° line across the face of the stock. Do this:

    created at: 02/03/2015 

    Just make sure the pivot point is butted firmly against the edge once you've made your rotation. There. 20° line. Two seconds. 

    The speed square's "rough and tumble" build quality is a strength, and key to its usefulness on a variety of projects. It's cast aluminum, not finely machined, which means you won't think twice about throwing it in a toolbox, taking it to a buddy's house, or using on a ladder above hard concrete, because there's no way for it to go out of whack. If you drop it, it'll still be a-okay. 

    Oh, and they cost less than ten bucks. With that price, you might as well get two. Just make sure to keep the little blue book to reference in case you want to learn more about the Hip-Val scale. 

    ManMade recommended: 

                Swanson Tool SO101 7-inch Speed Square -  $9.48 

                Swanson Tool SO107 12-Inch Speed Square - $18.23

     

     

     

     


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    This post is in partnership with Murphy-Goode Winery.

    I don't think any gift you can purchase can ever really capture the way you feel about your dad. It's just too complex a relationship; the feelings run too deep. But you can buy something that shows you know him, know what his interests are, and took the time to get him a gift you thought would matter to him. That's what we're here to help with. This guide contains all the stuff we'd want to get (or give) for Father's Day, with items for every budget and price range. Whether you're buying for your own parent, your spouse or partner, or making a wish list for yourself, we think it'll make your job a little easier this year, and hope everyone ends up with something they treasure.    

     

     

    We teamed up with Murphy-Goode Winery for this post. Murphy-Goode has been a ManMade partner a bunch of times before, including, most recently, our Young Man's Guide to Hosting Thanksgiving, and our post on 30 Things Every Man Should Know about Grilling. Their wines taste great, with complex flavors that actually enhance the flavor of the food you're eating. 

    Want to go deeper? Check out our Complete Guide to Understanding Wine, or our list of 30 Things Every Man Should Own by the Time He's 30.

    Let's get started the same way most guys start their day ... with coffee! 

    1. A Truly Great Coffee Mug - $30-50:  A mug is a textbook Father's Day gift. Our vote? Skip out on the "World's Greatest Dad" or Sunday funnies characters and get something thrown by a real ceramicist. There is amazing pottery coming out of cities all over the US right now. Find dad one that will evoke deep envy from everyone in the office break room. (Pictured: Mazama Large Mug, $42)

     

    2. Wood Handled Carpenter's Axe - Around $60: If you try to get an axe at your local home center, you'll find nothing but plastic and fiberglass handles with dull, poor-quality steel heads. This carpenter's style axe is modeled after the classic Hudson Bay design. It's not designed for felling huge trees, but works well for woodworking tasks like splitting, riving, as well as small forestry work such as trimming limbs, branches, and cross cutting. Makes a great first high-quality tool.

    More interested in chopping logs into usable firewood or felling trees with speed? Check out the Splitting Maul and Multipurpose Axe from the same series.

     

    3. Timex Weekender Chronograph Slip-Thru Strap Watch - $40-45: The watch is a standard dad gift, but high end pieces often cost a bit much for your average Dad's Day budget. Instead, go with a model designed not for the boardroom, but, as the name suggests, the off-hours. The Weekender Chronograph features classic styling with easily interchangeable bands to match a variety of looks. That's a whole buncha' watch for around $40. 

     

    4. The Godfather Collection: The Coppola Restoration on Blu Ray - From $25: There are only a handful of films that - no matter what you're doing - you're compelled to stop and watch when they're on television. The Godfather trilogy tops that list, but now that you own it, you don't have to wait for the broadcast. Part III aside, it's truly some of the all-time greatest American filmmaking. Plus - the extras on this thing are outstanding. 

     

    5. Really Nice Meat & Cheese Board - Starting at $30: Good charcuterie deserves good presentation. High-quality apps and snacks simply look better on a big slab of walnut than they do on a dinner plate. This piece gets you rich wood grain and a renewable, sandable surface without breaking the bank.  

     

    6. Good Clean Fun by Nick Offerman - $20: Equal parts creativity manifesto, humorous essays, and woodworking how-to, Offerman's latest book leaves you laughing, inspired, and ready to make something.

     

    7. Hay Bullet Pen - Under $8: Carry a piece of modern Scandinavian design with you wherever you go. Sleek and weighted just right, this thing is in the MoMA, so you know they got something right. Thankfully, its price won't make you too scared to actually use it.

     

    8. Low-angle block plane - $165: When you're ready to move up from hammer, nails, and 2x4s to finer work, your first hand tool should be a low-angle block plane. With a sharp blade, this thing will trim end grain, smooth surfaces, clean up machining marks, and help create a beautiful finish on your final project. The made in the US model from Lie-Nielsen is worth the price, and will last for generations.

     

    9. A bunch of iPhone cables - Starting at $6.00: A gift that no one would probably buy for themselves, but every single person will delight in opening. These magical talismen work like gold currency around a house or office shared with others. Get enough to keep one in every room, and a few secret options just in case.

     

    10. Tartine Bread by Chad Robertson - $22-25A complete (and we mean complete) guide from the man considered the be the best bread maker in the country. Learn to turn out crackling crusts full of color that give way to bread so flavorful you won't believe it's just flour, salt, water, and yeast. 

     

    11. The Ultimate Grilling Supplies Kit:  Around this time of year, fancy boxes full of very large grilling tools with seemingly classy wood handles pop up to entice Father's Day gift buyers as an easy, all-in-one option. And, inevitably, they suck. Instead, assemble your own grilling kit using well-reviewed and time-tested utensils, no juice-spilling fork need apply.

    12. Yarai Mixing Glass ($33) and Barspoon ($25): Cocktails containing all spirits - like a martini, Negroni, Gibson, Boulevardier - are best stirred with ice to maintain a clear, cold, heavy texture. The Japanese-style Yarai is the key to ice-cold perfection.  

     

    13. Leather Moleskin Notebook Cover -  from $25: This is the best of both worlds. The high-quality and style points of a leather-bound notebook, with the flexibility of replaceable inserts to keep it useful for years. Handmade from Horween Leather tanned in Chicago.

     

    14. The Murphy-Goode Wine Club - Nothing's better than a gift that keeps on giving. Receive quarterly shipments of both your favorites and something new to try, all at a 20% discount. Membership features to-your-door delivery and special club member offers you simply can't access any other way.

     

    15. Bob Dylan: All the Songs - the Story Behind Every Track by Philippe Margotin and Jean-Michel Guesdon - Around $34: The authoritative guide to every single piece by one of America's greatest songwriters. Keep it open while playing the albums, and it enhances every listening experience. 

     

    16. Classic Cash Money Clip - from $9.99: Next time you go out on the town, leave the pocket pillow at home and throw a few essential cards and bills in this simple stainless money clip. Fits beautifully in a jacket pocket, and is affordable enough that you can be both a wallet and a money clip guy, whichever the occasion calls for.  

     

    17. Narex Chisel Set - Around $40: Kept sharp, a quality set of chisels can go a long way and open up possibilities for projects in the workshop or around the house. The Narex line from Czechoslovakia offer the perfect balance between performance and value, and, when well cared for, will hold an edge beautifully and tackle anything you throw at them. 

     

    18. Wilderness Survival by Gregory J. Davenport - $18-20: A no-nonsense guide to staying alive in the woods, period. Clear, concise, solidly illustrated, Davenport explains the "why" along with the "how," so you can actually remember this stuff when the time comes.

     

    19. Aeropress Coffee & Espresso Maker (About $30) and Stainless Filter ($8-12): Giving a gift to a coffee guy? If dad is ready to move on from the automatic drip machine and has already mastered the French Press, help him step up his game with the ingeniously designed Aeropress. This piece of innovation uses air pressure to create exceedingly smooth and flavorful coffee, and it's the closest you can get to a rich espresso crema at home without spending hundreds or thousands of dollars. We like the washable stainless filter for ease, and together, they create the perfect travel coffee option.

     

    20. Orbit Basic Turntable - $179: If you're looking for a splurge-level gift he just won't buy for himself, our vote is cast for this stylish turntable. In the era of streaming apps and having any song you want available in an instant, buying actual physical albums allows music to be special again.  

     

    21. Style and the Man by Alan Flusser - Around $7:This quote from Ralph Lauren tells you everything you need to know. “Alan Flusser is one of the most knowledgeable experts on men’s fashion, and has created the ultimate reference for everything you need to know about good taste, great style, and where to find it throughout the world.” Done. 

     

    22. Eighteen Bottle Stackable Wine Rack - Starting at $30: We don't know when the wine rack got so complicated. Wine racks are not decor, they're a tool for organizing. They only need to do one thing: store wine on its side so the cork stays saturated and won't spoil the wine. This simple rack holds up to 18 bottles, which is exactly enough. And if it's not, they stack or attach side-to-side to easily expand your collection.  

    What's on my wine rack? Here are a few of my faves from Murphy-Goode right now: 

     

    23. 50-Piece Mini HSS Drill Bit Set - About $20: Look in any multi-piece drill bit set, and you'll likely notice one thing: all the smallest sizes are missing. These are the ones we use most, and they break, disappear, and become worn out. This box gives you ten of each of the smallest sizes so you have what you need, when you need it.

     

    24. Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing by Michael Ruhlman and Brian Polcyn - Around $25: A truly complete guide to all things meatcraft. Ruhlman and Polcyn look at centuries of traditions, and come up with legitimate and accessible techniques to making them at home. If you've ever wondered what to do with a certain cut, this book will tell you. 

     

    25. Yuma Woven Tie - $20: There is no more iconic Father's Day gift than a tie. Which, if you do it right, is fine by us. Lately, we're digging the tie that gets its subtle character not from pattern, but texture. The complex weave brings tons of contrast and visual interest, and will look great with darn near anything.  

     

    26. Norwegian Wood: Chopping, Stacking, and Drying Wood the Scandinavian Way by Lars Mytting - Around $18: If you're wondering whether you can fill an entire book with engaging ideas about firewood, the answer is a resounding yes. In fact, this is one of our favorite items on the list. There is serious history and tradition here, and the workmanship is undeniable. Seriously, give this one a shot. 

     

    27. Merkur Classic Straight Safety Razor - Starting at $20: If you or the dad in your life is still using the cartridge razor — seriously, it's time to move on. The classic safety razor is miles more affordable, provides a better, more controlled shaving experience, and, frankly, looks way better sitting on your vanity. Only drawback - you can't take it through airport security, but it's worth it the other eleven and half months of the year.  

     

    28. DKnight MagicBox II Bluetooth 4.0 Portable Wireless speaker - About $30: We're not calling it a "beater" speaker, but sometimes, you need a model that isn't designed to sit on a shelf and fill your entire home with high-fidelity sound. Instead, it's a rugged option that moves easily among rooms, can be tossed in the car for a camping or beach trip, and can stand up to falling on the floor. Get the black so fingerprints full of grease and dirt won't show and you can bring along the tunes wherever your projects or adventures take you.

     

    29. Wine Aerator - $10-12: It's a scientific fact: wine tastes better as it interacts with the air. It might sound a little pinky-in-the-air, but reds really do need to "breathe" in order to show their full potential. The easiest way is to incorporate oxygen right as it comes out of the bottle with a simple aerator. Ten dollars very well spent.

     

    30. Cabin Porn: Inspiration for Your Quiet Place Somewhere by Zach Klein - Around $23: The title is a little regrettable, but the images here are simply stunning. When you're stuck inside and need to imagine yourself someplace else, this will do it. 

    31. Real Old Fashioned Fly Swatter - $8: When did finding a fly swatter that actually works become so complicated? This model from Garrett Wade harkens back to the glory days of summer, before plastic handles and terrible design. Built to last, and licensed to swat.

     

    32. Classic Coleman Cooler - From $60: There are coolers, and there is the Coleman cooler. Nothing says guy on a weekend camping trip like one of these. Bonus: makes a mighty fine impromptu seat for roasting food on sticks over a fire. Accept no substitutes.  

     

    33. Calvin and Hobbes Complete Collection - Around $60:  Hands down, undeniably and without question, the best comic strip of all time. Features four full-color volumes in a display case, this best-selling edition includes all Calvin and Hobbes cartoons that ever appeared in syndication. 

     

    34. Dozuki Japanese pull saw - Starting at $28:  An extremely elegant and useful tool at an incredible price. Handsaws go where machines can't, and can cut precision joinery like dovetails. The thin kerf makes it easier to move through wood, and feature an easily replaceable blade for when the teeth wear out.  

     

    35. Wall-Mounted Bottle Opener - $5 and up: Perhaps not super strong as a standalone gift, but it makes a nice little bonus or part of a set. Why? Cause these things are crazy useful. They stay put, and that way, you always know where your bottle opener is. Always.  Go for a stainless-steel model so it can be mounted outside. 

     

    36. The Artful Wooden Spoon by Joshua Vogel - Around $18: Equal parts coffee table art book and practical how-to guide, this book expresses the elegance of what a felled tree can become. Essential reading for anyone interested in working with wood.  

     

    37. Readywares Wax Utility Apron - Starting at $33: If you, or your dad, are the kind of guys who read a site like ManMade, you're the kind of guy who makes messes. A standard all-purpose apron works for grilling, carpentry, leather working, bike maintenance, woodworking, cooking, cocktail mixing, painting, blacksmithing, or whatever task you take on. Heavy duty waxed canvas and brass hardware means it will stand up to the task.  

     

    38. Leatherman Rev - About $30: No tool can do everything, but for something that can fit in your pocket, a Leatherman gets pretty close. We love the Rev for it's balance - the tools are big enough to be useful, but the whole thing folds down and remains light enough to carry every day. It's fourteen tools include: needle nose pliers, regular pliers, hard-wire cutters, wire cutters, wire stripper, 420HC knife, package opener, ruler (1.5 in | 3.8 cm), can opener, bottle opener, wood/metal file, Phillips screwdriver, medium screwdriver, and small screwdriver.

     

    39. Meat: Everything You Need to Know by Pat LaFrieda - Around $25: Literally, everything you need to know. The country's most famous butcher dives deep into creating recipes that showcase the value and potential of the cut, including beef, pork, poultry, lamb, and veal. Sharpen your knives, and go. 

     

    40. Stainless Steel Measuring Jigger - About $7:  So long, old-school fill-to-the-top cocktail measuring tools. With its simple pour spout, easy-to-read (and not spill) gradations, there's no better way to measure your portions accurately.

     

    42. Spoon Carving Knives - Morakniv 162 and 120: Carving a wooden spoon or kitchen utensil is about as satisfying a woodworking project as there is. It's practical, open to all kinds of design choices, and clean enough that you can do it while sitting on the sofa. The best part, you only need two simple knives to get started: the straight carving, or sloyd, knife for the outer shape, and the hook for the middle. The Mora series are high-quality, affordable, and the standard place to start.

     

    I hope you found something on this list you think your dad (spouse, brother, grandpa, etc.) will love. Still, I know there are probably a hundred other great gift ideas I didn't think of. What the most amazing, impressive, unique, or thoughtful gift you've ever given or received? What's the World's Best Gift for the World's Best Dad? Let me know in the comments (and who knows ... maybe we'll update our list!). 

    Happy Father's Day, guys!

     

     

     

    This post is sponsored by Murphy-Goode, but all opinions are mine alone. We like working with them because they care about the same things we do: bringing people together over great food and good wine. Thanks for supporting the brands that make ManMade possible.

     


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    created at: 08/27/2015

    First, apologies to the young man who stood in front of me at the post office yesterday. He was trying, but not trying too hard. He was going for a slightly updated classic New England collegiate look: blue button down oxford, dark green chinos, killer brown leather boots, 60's-inspired glasses. His hair was parted pretty traditionally, the kind of clipper/scissor combo cut you can get at any modern barbershop. He didn't ask to inspire an article about hair product.    

    Maybe he was having an off day. We all have them. We apply the goo when your hair's a little too damp, or get a little too much on our fingers and just rub it in anyway. But, all that gunk totally cut his style points in half. His whole head was just screaming "I put stuff in my hair today. You can see it, right?"

    Don't be that guy. Don't let product misuse ruin your whole thing. You don't want people to see it. For a natural look, follow these simple techniques, and get on with your day. 

     

    1) Don't start in the front. This was post office guy's crucial mistake. Looking right at him, you could see exactly how his hair ended up that way. He put a big dollop on his fingers, and ran them straight through the front of his hairline, right along the scalp, cementing the path of travel of his hand for the rest of the day. 

    This puts all the product at the bottom of your hair follicles, giving that spike-y bang look that should be left to 1997 high school freshman. 

    Instead: Place product across your fingers, and rub it around a little to distribute evenly. Then, work your way from the back to the front, spreading the product from the base of your head to to the ends of your hair, working along your part. This gives your hair actual structure, not just weight. 

     

    created at: 08/27/2015

    2. You can always add more. Most modern products (at least the ones you should be using) are designed to increase styling ability, not to cement an existing style in place. Don't grab and spread everything you need in one go. 

    Instead: use all your fingers to add the product in light coats to cover just stuff above your crown. Unless you have long hair, you can probably leave the sides alone. Then, with your hands still sticky, pull it everywhichway until its where you want it.


    3. Apply first, style second.  If you have short hair that's slightly longer on the top (the classic men's cut), don't try to set that slightly mussed look in from the beginning.

    Instead: following rules number one and two, lightly and evenly apply to you hair, and roughly style it. Let it dry for 5-10 minutes, then break up any clumps, pull it up and out, and get the mess. It's never going to be perfect in one go. Concentrate on getting the stuff in there first, and then finalize the look in the mirror after a few minutes, or in the rearview on the way to your night out. 

     

     

     


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    Space-Saving Shop Projects

    I work in a tiny, leaky, antique shed. Workspace is a precious commodity that keeps getting taken up by scraps and in-progress pieces and just plain junk.    From time to time, I really need new ways to store stuff and I have referenced this webpage for more than one really great, "I can't believe I didn't think of that!" project.

    Here's a few projects on the page:

    Popular Woodoworking space-saving projects

    The multi-layer pantry cabinet tool chest

    Expanding Parts RackThe expanding wood and parts rack

    space saving shop projects...and my favorite, the folding work table.

    See all the projects (and some amazing dad jeans from 2009) over at Popular Woodworking.

    If you need more details: I found an Archive.org PDF of the entire article that details all the projects with cut lists and more.


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    It's the classic finish to every story. The hero overcomes the odds, beats the villain, and rises victorious from the ashes of his enemy. But is that how life really works? The real world doesn't seem to support such a clear-cut approach to how we "win". My experience so far tells me a very different story, and we'd all be better off if we marched to a much different rhythm.    

    I remember a few years ago talking to someone about their car buying experience. My friend said, "I told the sales guy I wanted the best deal they could give me while making sure they were taken care of." With my opinion of car salesmen, it sounded like a stupid plan at the time, but it worked out well enough that he's gone on to buy many more cars, houses, and other big items with the same approach. Without fail, he say it's a better experience for everyone. The deals are still on par with what he would get with the hard-line approach, perhaps even better, but he skips the unappealing fight. Ever since, I've tried to look at the world in this way; and let me tell you, it works.

    The shift in mindset is to a teamwork mentality, instead of a bare-knuckle battle. Sound like a big leap for you? Well here are the things that made it easy for me to shift it around and enjoy life a bit more. Hint: this isn't just about buying or selling, it applies to everything in life. Like your friend's new job or boat, or a promotion you wanted to snag at work.

    1. There is always enough.

    Contrary to popular belief, there is plenty in this world. Living a life with the mindset of scarcity is an internal issue, and has very little to do with the outside world. If you can train your mind to understand there will always be enough, it will stick. I have found enough money (with sweat equity of course), enough time (with proper priorities and boundaries), and plenty of work by being creative, positive, and consistent. You make more opportunities than you will ever find, and once you know where to look, there is always enough to get what you want. It hurts you substantially to feel like there are only a few nice houses out there and you're missing out, or that the only job promotion in the world just passed you by. When the ocean of opportunity opens up to you, there is a lot more freedom to do well and be rewarded.

    2. Stop thinking that there has to be a loser when someone is winning. (And especially that it's you.)

    You are not in direct competition with your peers at all times.  If you start to look at the person on the other side as an actual human that you want to succeed, everything changes. Life is a long game,It may be hard to cheer for someone else getting what you want, but when that day comes and you finally get something great, don't you want everyone to cheer you on? Pay it forward today and down the road you'll be much better off.

    3. They're not evil for wanting to win too.

    With very few exceptions, the other guy isn't evil. Their new house or job promotion was due to hard work and maybe some good luck, and it's unlikely they stabbed someone in the back to get there. Just because they suceeded doesn't mean they're morally compromised. Stop justifying success with the sliding scale of "well I'm just not willing to do (insert insult here) to win" thinking. 

    4. Success is contagious.

    Abraham Lincoln once said "Do I not destroy my enemies when I make them friends?" So, if you join in and cheer on success in others, aren't you part of the winning team? Here's the thing, when you actively cheer on the success of others, you start to walk in it too. You actively participate in the growth of success, and that bleeds off. It's hard to stay poor surrounded by big thinking successful people, so jump on the ship and rise with the tide.

    5. We all can win.

    If you're willing to embrace the idea that there is always enough, that everyone can win, and can be passionate about other's success, big things can happen. The main reason is that the odds change. It's no longer a longshot to discover the promotion or the dream home, it's just becomes a matter of consistent, dedicated work, and with a cadre of friends cheering on your success, it happens faster than you can imagine.

    I've been practicing these principles for a few years now, and I've been really impressed with how it's made me a better friend and confidant to the guys that I'm closest with. When someone genuinely celebrates your success, it just feels right. So, make the leap and start looking for the win in those around you.

     

     


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    Four years ago, I shared an introduction to making smoked cocktails on ManMade, exploring the techniques and ingredients that would allow you to create woodsy, rich drinks at home. I offered several ways to create and capture smoke, but admitted that I preferred a specialized, $100 tool designed for doing just that.  Ever since then, at least once or twice a month, I've received an email asking me how to pull this off without buying any specialty gear.

    To which I say: challenge accepted! I totally get not wanting to spend a large sum of money to make something you're not sure you're even going to like. I wouldn't either. So, let's break down the process and see what we can do to make some seriously tasty smoked cocktails using things you already have.    

    First up — what's a smoked cocktail?

    Smoking a drink is the same process as smoking food: meat, fish, cheese, and the like. By placing the food, or drink, in a closed container in the presence of smoke, you allow the ingredients to take on the flavorful molecules created by wood combustion, or fire. This process can take just a few seconds, or over a period of several days.

    When we smoke a cocktail, we are cold smoking, that is, flavoring the food without heating it up and cooking it. This is a similar process used to smoke cheese, olives, some fish, or bacon, a smoked product you also need to cook before eating it. Hot smoking happens at higher temperatures, both flavoring the product and cooking it to a desired temperature, as with ribs or a brisket for BBQ.

    Creating smoke for cocktails

    To make food-safe smoke, you need two things: wood and heat. You can use almost any chunk or stick of wood as long as you know what species it comes from. You're looking for a hardwood like oak, maple, hickory, apple, cherry, alder, etc. If you have a tree, you're set (though the wood will still be green, it will generate enough smoke for a small application like this). The easiest way is to simply get some hardwood chunks, chips, or sawdust sold for precisely this purpose. You can get these in the grilling section of the hardware store, the home improvement center, or a culinary shop. Something like this $4.00 bag of apple wood chips would produce enough smoke for hundreds of cocktails. 

    After that, you just need to light it. A lighter or match will do, but if you have a blowtorch, the higher temp and direct heat will allow you to start the wood smoking without actually creating flames. Make sure you work outside or in a well-ventilated area, and that the ignited wood always stays on a fire-proof surface. Aluminum foil is your friend here. 

    How to Make a DIY Smoked Cocktail at Home

    Here's what you'll need: 

    • Mixed cocktail at room temp (or you can try simply smoking a base spirit like whiskey or tequila)
    • Small piece of approved hardwood (see list above)
    • Lighter or blowtorch
    • Fire safe surface such as a sheet tray or aluminum foil
    • Mason jar with airtight lid

    Measure out the proportions of your cocktail, but don't add any ice at this point. Just have it ready to go. When you're done, move any and all alcohol far away from where the flame is going to be. 

     

    Next, prep your wood. You only need a very small bit, like a single chip or a twig. I simply axed off a corner of a cherry wood chunk I keep with my grilling supplies.

     

    Place the wood on a non-flammable surface and light it with a lighter or blowtorch. You don't need any actual flames: stop when the wood starts to blacken and you see little wisps of smoke. They're more than enough

     

    Once it has begun to smoke, place the empty jar over the smoldering wood to capture all that flavorful goodness.

     

    When the jar is totally white with smoke, add the lid to capture it inside.

     

    Then pour your premixed cocktail into the jar, and reseal with the lid. It's okay if a little smoke escapes here; there will still be plenty to flavor your drink.

     

    Lastly, just swirl it around to mix the liquid with the smoke. This can be just a few seconds, or as much as a minute or longer (the smoke will likely have dissipated by then). I say start with 15-20 seconds for your first time, then adjust based on your taste.

    And...

     

    That's it. Once it's done, pour the whole thing into a glass with ice, garnish, and enjoy.  

     

    I'll admit, I have tried shaking or stirring a cocktail with ice and serving it "up" after it's been smoked. I only can think of a few cocktails I drink that way — like a martini, a gimlet, or a daiquiri — and I don't think any of those would mix well with smoke in the first place. If you're looking at a drink that could go either way, like a Manhattan or margarita, I say just decide that when smoking cocktails, you're enjoying those on the rocks. 

     

    It's such a little bit of time and smoke compared to something like slow smoking a whole pork shoulder over a period of twelve hours. But, you'll be surprised with how smokey this super simple process can make your drinks, and, hopefully, surprising how tasty they've become. Enjoy. 

    What should we smoke next? Share your ideas and questions in the comments below.

     


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    Four years ago, I shared an introduction to making smoked cocktails on ManMade, exploring the techniques and ingredients that would allow you to create woodsy, rich drinks at home. I offered several ways to create and capture smoke, but admitted that I preferred a specialized, $100 tool designed for doing just that.  Ever since then, at least once or twice a month, I've received an email asking me how to pull this off without buying any specialty gear.

    To which I say: challenge accepted! I totally get not wanting to spend a large sum of money to make something you're not sure you're even going to like. I wouldn't either. So, let's break down the process and see what we can do to make some seriously tasty smoked cocktails using things you already have.    

    First up — what's a smoked cocktail?

    Smoking a drink is the same process as smoking food: meat, fish, cheese, and the like. By placing the food, or drink, in a closed container in the presence of smoke, you allow the ingredients to take on the flavorful molecules created by wood combustion, or fire. This process can take just a few seconds, or over a period of several days.

    When we smoke a cocktail, we are cold smoking, that is, flavoring the food without heating it up and cooking it. This is a similar process used to smoke cheese, olives, some fish, or bacon, a smoked product you also need to cook before eating it. Hot smoking happens at higher temperatures, both flavoring the product and cooking it to a desired temperature, as with ribs or a brisket for BBQ.

    Creating smoke for cocktails

    To make food-safe smoke, you need two things: wood and heat. You can use almost any chunk or stick of wood as long as you know what species it comes from. You're looking for a hardwood like oak, maple, hickory, apple, cherry, alder, etc. If you have a tree, you're set (though the wood will still be green, it will generate enough smoke for a small application like this). The easiest way is to simply get some hardwood chunks, chips, or sawdust sold for precisely this purpose. You can get these in the grilling section of the hardware store, the home improvement center, or a culinary shop. Something like this $4.00 bag of apple wood chips would produce enough smoke for hundreds of cocktails. 

    After that, you just need to light it. A lighter or match will do, but if you have a blowtorch, the higher temp and direct heat will allow you to start the wood smoking without actually creating flames. Make sure you work outside or in a well-ventilated area, and that the ignited wood always stays on a fire-proof surface. Aluminum foil is your friend here. 

    How to Make a DIY Smoked Cocktail at Home

    Here's what you'll need: 

    • Mixed cocktail at room temp (or you can try simply smoking a base spirit like whiskey or tequila)
    • Small piece of approved hardwood (see list above)
    • Lighter or blowtorch
    • Fire safe surface such as a sheet tray or aluminum foil
    • Mason jar with airtight lid

    Measure out the proportions of your cocktail, but don't add any ice at this point. Just have it ready to go. When you're done, move any and all alcohol far away from where the flame is going to be. 

     

    Next, prep your wood. You only need a very small bit, like a single chip or a twig. I simply axed off a corner of a cherry wood chunk I keep with my grilling supplies.

     

    Place the wood on a non-flammable surface and light it with a lighter or blowtorch. You don't need any actual flames: stop when the wood starts to blacken and you see little wisps of smoke. They're more than enough

     

    Once it has begun to smoke, place the empty jar over the smoldering wood to capture all that flavorful goodness.

     

    When the jar is totally white with smoke, add the lid to capture it inside.

     

    Then pour your premixed cocktail into the jar, and reseal with the lid. It's okay if a little smoke escapes here; there will still be plenty to flavor your drink.

     

    Lastly, just swirl it around to mix the liquid with the smoke. This can be just a few seconds, or as much as a minute or longer (the smoke will likely have dissipated by then). I say start with 15-20 seconds for your first time, then adjust based on your taste.

    And...

     

    That's it. Once it's done, pour the whole thing into a glass with ice, garnish, and enjoy.  

     

    I'll admit, I have tried shaking or stirring a cocktail with ice and serving it "up" after it's been smoked. I only can think of a few cocktails I drink that way — like a martini, a gimlet, or a daiquiri — and I don't think any of those would mix well with smoke in the first place. If you're looking at a drink that could go either way, like a Manhattan or margarita, I say just decide that when smoking cocktails, you're enjoying those on the rocks. 

     

    It's such a little bit of time and smoke compared to something like slow smoking a whole pork shoulder over a period of twelve hours. But, you'll be surprised with how smokey this super simple process can make your drinks, and, hopefully, surprising how tasty they've become. Enjoy. 

    What should we smoke next? Share your ideas and questions in the comments below.

     

     

    Here are the most important steps, all collaged up into an easy to share graphic. If you like it, please share on Pinterest!


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    I've been looking at making a small forge for a while now. The main goal is to dip my toe into metal working just a little bit, so something that can heat up about 6" stock is all I want. This weekend, I gathered up some basic materials and made myself a small forge.    

    A small propane forge is useful when working on shaping and tempering knives, and other small items of metal. It's important to keep the fuel usage efficient, so the smallest space possible helps to conserve that spendy gas. Also, I plan on working on all of my metal outside, because I like to keep my house unburnt, so something that can be moved around without too much heft is the way to go. Here are the steps I took:

    Materials

    1. Fire Bricks ($3 each)- I used 9 of the standard hard fire bricks (9"x 4.5") for the forge because I wanted something that could take a beating, and stay outside. The hard bricks are a beast to drill through, (use a masonry bit) and don't insulate as well as the soft, but they're durable enough to hold up to just about anything.

    2. Vermiculite Insulation ($12 each) - Two 12" square pieces of 1" thick vermiculite was great to really insulate the inside of the forge, I used one of them to line the forge, and will use the next when it wears out. This can be cut with a razor blade, avoid breathing any of the dust while cutting.

    3.Perforated Steel Angle ($10)- I used two pieces of this steel angle, with 2 cut into 12" pieces, and two cut to about 14".  I used threaded rod to attach them together.

    4. Threaded Rod and Bolts - I used standard threaded rod and bolts with washers to pinch the whole thing together, make sure to check the holes in your steel angle to be sure they fit.

    5. Blowtorch and Fuel ($50) - I have a Bernzomatic TS8000 that uses MAPP gas, so I sized the hole to fit. I'll likely upgrade to a homemade forced air propane burner in the future for the economy of the gas and faster heat times, but for now this is convenient and easy to use. Make sure that the air intake holes in the torch burner are outside of the hole, so air can mix with the gas.

    The Steps

    1. Stack the bricks - I stacked three bricks on the bottom (one extra to rest the metal stock on while heating), one on each side, two in the back, and then two on top. This gave me about a 4" opening inside. The bricks should all fit tight without mortar, but keep an eye out for any irregularities, I had to swap around a few slightly bowed bricks to make sure it was a tight fit where it mattered on the top and sides.

     

    2. Drill the burner hole - I used a masonry bit to drill the proper sized hole for my burner to fit through, about halfway down one side of the opening. Keep in mind that the added Vermiculate liner will be in there and plan accordingly.

     

    3. Lay out and cut the steel angle - I cut the steel angle into about 12" pieces for the top, and 14" for the bottom. Be sure to measure as your bricks may be a bit different. A single hole should stuck out of the front and back for the threaded rod. Once the steel was cut to size, I measured and cut the threaded rod to fit.

     

    4. Thread it together - The threaded rod stretches from side to side and pinches the blocks together. I cinched it down with washers and bolts. Now, the top and bottom should be tight together. From here, I welded flat stock on each side to hold the top and bottom tight, but the leftover angle steel could be used to bolt it all down as well.

     

    5. Cut and install the liner - The forge can be used without the liner, but the liner reflects the heat better for a faster heat up cycle. Cut it to fit and slip into place, there's no need to secure it, as you will want to replace it as it wears out.

     

     6. Fire up and test - At this point, the forge is ready to heat up and use. Please be aware that you're heating up metal to 1000+ degrees so protect yourself and everyone around you with proper safety gear and a well ventilated area. Always have a fire extinguisher close and never leave it unattended.

    Did you make one yourself? I'd love to see it, and if you see anything I should do differently, let me know!

     

     


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    The team over at Gear Patrol captured a great inside look at the Legendary L.L. Bean factory in Brunswick, Maine and their process for making their iconic Bean Boots.

    created at: 07/23/2015

    If you don't already own a pair of Bean Boots, I cannot recommend them enough. Their simple design and rugged craftsmanship have lasted me many years and many more into the future. It's the perfect marriage of simple design meeting a basic need (to keep your feet dry) tied together with honest craftsmanship. I found the story and the video very inspiring as I continue to hone my own craftsmanship. 

    Read the story behind the boots and lear more over on Gear Patrol's Website.


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    created at: 06/16/2015

    Remember when you were a kid, and you never went inside during the summer, except to ask permission from your parents to run around the neighborhood with that new kid you just met, or to get another PB&J, which you promptly marched right back outside?

    Let's all do that again. Let's embrace bare feet, and staying up too late, and smell like chlorine and sunscreen. Let's have a summer.    

    Of course, it doesn't mean you still can't relax and watch great movies and binge on your Netflix series. It just means you should do it outside. Here's everything you need to turn your yard into an outdoor "sit-in" theater.    

    created at: 06/16/2015

    The Projector. Of course, you gotta have one. Digital projectors have dropped in price in the last five years that they now cost less than most HDTVs, and can create much bigger images. You can rent one, or borrow from a friend or work situation, but if you're looking to buy, we recommend the ViewSonic PJD5155 SVGA HDMI DLP, 3300 Lumens Projector. It's bright enough to use at dusk, and has simple HDMI inputs to connect all your devices without adapters. Just place it on a flat and stable surface when using, to avoid debris and allow the fans to keep things cool. While you're at it, go ahead and pick up a dedicated outdoor extension cord and multi-outlet strip so you can project from anywhere. 16-gauge should work just fine.

    For the source, you can use whatever you've got: laptop, DVD player, Apple TV, Roku, Xbox. If it works with a TV, it'll work with the projector. 

    ManMade Recommended: 

     

    The Audio. Many projectors have built in speakers, but you'll likely want another source for louder volume. You might have a portable Bluetooth speakers for smartphone use, and those work great for this application. If you don't have one, you don't need to pay for Bluetooth or wireless options just for movie watching; you can plug in with a simple cable. There's lots of ways to go here, just make sure you get one that's rated as LOUD so the whole yard can hear. Stereos, guitar amps, PA systems - anything you have will help. Also be sure to get a nice long cable so you can place the speaker away from the projector so you can hear easily. 

    ManMade Recommended: 

     

    created at: 06/16/2015

    The Screen. You can buy one, sure. But you can save tons of money and dial in the perfect size. First, get yourself some opaque fabric, like Carl's Blackout Cloth. Then, 

    • Get two lengths of 1/2" PVC pipe and fold and sew a channel along the bottom, and basic sleeve at the top, leaving some space to insert the hardware. If you don't have a sewing machine, you can try a strong adhesive like E6000 or PVA glue, or you could even use a medium weight staple gun.
    • Then, insert some evenly spaced grommets along the top.
    • Slide in the PVC and cut to size, and use rope and hooks to mount it (on a wall, your roof eaves, a shed, a tree, etc). You can easily remove the PVC and fold it up for storage, and insert some eyelet screws in your ceiling for indoor use. 

    This method gets you a very large screen for about $60 in materials. If you don't have a tree or wall or fence to hang it from, you can build a frame from PVC pipe or aluminum conduit, and keep it taught by securing guylines and stakes, like a tent. 

    ManMade Recommended: 

     

    created at: 06/16/2015

    The Seats. Of course, you should use what you have: patio chairs, lawn chairs, those stacking plastic Adirondacks from the hardware store. Anything will work. If you're looking to seat a bunch of people and allow everyone to see, just get a few military-surplus style blankets, and have everyone camp out on the ground. Done and done. 

    ManMade Recommended: 

     

     created at: 06/16/2015

    The Snacks. If you're turning on the grill or lighting up the firepit, s'mores taste pretty great on a blanket in front of an outdoor movie screen.

    But if you want to keep things simple? Popcorn, duh. It's the movies. Not the microwave junk, but real popcorn. And if you want to make great popcorn at home, you need to know one thing = only use white popcorn. It beats the pants off the yellow stuff, and in my experience, cooks more easily. It tastes great with just a little oil and salt, but welcomes butter and fancy seasonings perfectly. 

    You can make a bunch ahead of time and store in little bowls or just brown paper lunch bags. There's lots of great techniques. My current faves are the wok and lid method, Alton Brown's stainless steel bowl, and the America's Test Kitchen tester kernels

    ManMade Recommended: 

     So! Put some drinks in the cooler, plug in that projector, and enjoy your summer. 

     

     

    Photographs by Margaret Jacobsen. 

     

     


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    Old shirt lying on a table

    I have a few shirts I just can't seem to part with. They don't really fit me (they're much too big and baggy) and I never wear them. Ever. Some are at least five years old, and barely holding together. 

    handkerchief in a backpocket

    So, I decided to turn them into something more useful. Here's a simple way to turn your unused shirts into simple handkerchiefs. Sized just a bit smaller, this works as an awesome "how to make a DIY pocket square" technique as well. 

    Here's what you'll need:

    • An unwanted button-up shirt
    • fabric scissors
    • measuring tape or ruler
    • cardboard
    • fabric pins
    • iron
    • washable fabric pen

    First, we'll start by removing the back part of the shirt. That's the largest piece and the easiest to cut a large square from.

    large shirt cut out

    Next, we'll need to cut out a 13"x13" square. Do this by cutting out a square of cardboard to the same size, place it over the shirt and trace the permitter with a washable fabric marker. Once you've made the square outline, cut it out.

    cut pocket square laying on table

    Now it's time to create hems on all sides of the square. Do so by folding your first edge over 1/4" and ironing it flat.

    ironing a hem

    Next, fold your first fold over a second time and iron it.

    folding a hem

    Once you've folded and ironed the first side we'll pin down the fold to keep it steady for the sewing machine.

    pinning the hem down

    Repeat this process 3 more times, once for each side of the square. 

    pinned square on table

    Once everything is pinned, it's time to sew! I enlisted the help of my wife, she's a master seamstress—hence the feminine hands in the photo. This part is rather simple, just set your machine to do a straight stitch around the hems of the square. It's ok if you can't make a straight line, I certainly couldn't. It just adds to the uniqueness. Remember to pull up the machine foot when you come to a corner so you can spin it 90 degrees.

    stitching a handkerchief

    stitching a handkerchief

    When you've sewn all the way around and come back to your beginning, push your backup button on the machine and back up the stitch about 1/4 an inch. This will help secure the stitch. Don't forget, you'll need to tie off and cut your loose strings from the beginning stitch and the end stitch.shirt handkerchief

    To finish things up, iron the hem really well to get a sharp crease, then you'll be good to go!

     

     

    created at: 06/17/2015

     

     


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    Have you noticed? It's summer! It's the time of year when we dust off the backyard with friends and linger late into the night. There are so many great conversations I remember around a flickering fire, and I'm looking forward to more this year. But good conversations don't always come easy, so here are a few tips to get into the kind of convos you'll remember for years.  Friendship comes from your shared experience, and this type of depth helps to bring it all together. I know having a set of questions queued up for your guests feels a bit strange, but just take a few and have them ready to go if the silence gets too long. The key to a deep conversation is to ask the type of questions that are open ended and invite a story. Be ready to reciprocate with answers yourself. A finger of good whiskey helps to keep that conversation rolling too. And if you're not sitting 'round the fire, these work great for a long hike or road trip.

    1. Tell me about a time you were terrified? - This is a pretty deep question. It can bring up a jarring memory and open up a huge door to conversations on life, kids, health, sometimes loss. You'll come through this question with a lot of depth on them.

    2. What has been the happiest day in your life? - Again, this question really encourages depth, but comes with a bright side. Sometimes people really open up on this, other times it may be harder to answer this one. Let it flow wherever it leads.

    3. What does 10 years down the road look for you? - I always like to encourage people to dream, and a question like this makes it happen. This is the kind of question you really should focus on, don't fade off while they let you in on where they want this life to lead them.

    4. What are you most excited about in your life right now? - I absolutely love this question. It's the one they were hoping you would ask all night and gives them the opportunity to let you in on what is happening without sounding like an attention-grabbing loudmouth.

    5. What would you do with four hours of free time? - I have a list of things I wish I could do. It's that short but important list that never seems to happen, but really wakes me up when I finally get out there. This is where you learn about passions, hobbies, and what makes someone feel human again. For me, it's camping in a hammock, a paddleboard session at my local lake, and a fly-fishing session wherever I can find some fish. 

    6. What would someone say they liked about you? - I guarantee it's easier to talk to someone about what they're doing wrong, or what they think can be improved. But this question is more about building up the spirit again and reminding them about what they're good at. Take some time on this one, and let people see the good in themselves. 

    7. Who would you call your greatest mentor? - This one brings up some interesting history. I like it as a reminiscing conversation piece that opens up a back-story of where they came from. I always expected coaches and dads on this one, but actually people have a huge range of those that inspire them.

    So, the next time you're nursing a good drink with good friends, take a bit of time to really get to know what makes them tick. You'll come out more connected, entertained, and a bit closer to your friends. 

     


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    ManMade Essential Toolbox: Bin Storage

    Small-parts storage is one of the biggest steps you can take in creating the perfect workshop zen. When all those little fasteners, nails, washers, odds and ends all have a home you can work in peace, not pieces.

    The life of a DIY-er is paved with extra parts. Instead of just a singular hobby focus you've expand yourself into building and making almost anything and it's important to always keep around all those extra parts because you never know when you're going to need them again. However, it can be a nightmare storing all things! I don't want to admit how long I went with a teetering stack of cardboard nail and screw boxes piled on a shelf all mislabeled and rusted.  I finally gave in an invested in some serious bin storage for all my little bits and it's changed my life! 

    Types of Bin Storage

    There's two major types of bin storage that work for different kinds of needs. If you have a permanent shop and not the garage with the car backed out, you might find a better investment in wall and shelf bin storage. These are the more common products you'll see with hundreds of tiny plastic drawers with detailed labels. These boxes can be secured to the wall for easy and permanent access. 

    ManMade Essentials: Bin Storage

    Arko Mils 44 Drawer Cabinet

     

    The other kind is more portable in nature. Perfect for DIYers like me who don't have any kind of permanent shop. These products allow me to toss all my things into my truck and head to my next project or stack them neatly in my shed for easy access when I need them. They seal tight and keep each compartment intact as you sling them around. I have two different kinds of portable bin storage.

    ManMade Essentials: Bin Storage

    One is my larger Husky cantilever storage system. Here's where I store all kind of odds and ends like compressor parts, stray machine screws, Dremel accessories, razor blades and more. It's my catch-all for small items that don't have a home. If you don't have a ton of shop bits (not yet at least) start with one of these.

    ManMade Essentials: Bin Storage

    If you find that your bits and pieces seem to grow exponentially with every project, you might want to invest in a more modular system like a stacking deep-bin organizer case. I have several of these, arranged by use: screws, nails, nuts and bolts, etc.

    ManMade Essentials: Bin StorageThe best part is that each bin is removable. Need your 2-inch screws for a project? No need to take the entire box with you, just slip out the inner bin and leave the rest behind. It's simply amazing. 

    If you continue down the thrilling path of DIY trust me when I say you're going to really need these storage solutions. The best part is all of these products are inexpensive and in the end will save you time and money by keeping track of all the little things you would otherwise lose or throw away.

    Man Made Recommended

    Permanent Bins

     

    Portable Bins

     

    If you need more inspiration on the zen of shop organization, check out the shop of one of my favorite gods of DIY, Adam Savage, and see how he keeps his OCD at bay with his awesome storage system.

     


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    Did you know there are more fish in the water than stars in the sky? S

    eriously, the water you have within a few minutes of your house is almost guaranteed to be sheltering a school of those fin-tailed creatures just below the surface. All those mouths have to eat, and it's easier than you think to get started in the timeless art of fly fishing.    Fly fishing has been described to me as more art than science, and I'm inclined to agree. There is a delicate balance between the gear and the organic offerings of small flies or indicators that mimic the natural prey of the fish you're going for. Of course, there's also the classic image of a casting fisherman with the line arced gracefully over his head as he seamlessly presents the fly to the waiting fish. That's about as alive as you can get right there.

    Fish are creatures of habit, and very attentive to changes in their food's behavior, that's why a natural drift or movement is so important to getting them to take the bait. It takes practice, and it takes good instruction. That's why on something like this you need to find a guide or skilled friend to show you the ropes. They should be able to show you how to tie it all together, how to get it where it needs to be, and how to have a ton of fun along the way.

    Now, before you can get all the way down that road, let's back up to the basics: How do I get started? Well, here's a list, and a few tips to get you out there casting.

     

    1. Waders

     A quality set of waders will keep you dry and warm while you're stalking those prey. There are a few options, but be sure to skip the cheaper neoprene and go for a breathable set with booties. Don't go for integrated boots, they're a weak point in the setup.

    ManMade Recommended: Cabela's Breathable Waders ($120)

     

    2. Wading Boots

     These are the anchor while you're stomping (quietly, I hope) through the river. Go for something with a solid grip that can hold tight on slick rocks. Felt is good for weeded areas, but they're not as versatile. I'm a fan of the Korkers, with interchangeable grips that can be easily replaced when they wear out or things change. 

    ManMade Recommended: Korkers Redside ($140)

     

     

    3. Fly Rod, Reel, Line

     The first fly rod is a big deal. It's what you'll learn on, and likely enjoy for years to come. The first thing to consider is what you'll be using it on, and for most of us that's small streams and medium rivers. Casting on those waters will be done with a short leader and medium distances. A 5 or 6 weight rod about 8.5 to 9 ft long is about right for most of the waters you can expect, and will give a good fight to your catches. If you want to start out with something cheap but fully outfitted try the Redington Combo kit, it's a bit light, but you'll have everything you need. If you have the extra cash, the Fly Shop combo kit has a bit more upgraded reel and comes with an extra tip (we all break them, this is really nice to have).

     

     

    4. Starter Flies

     This is where we really get to see the mix of art and science, as we take hand-tied materials and somehow they're turned into realistic imitations of the real nymphs, caddis, and even mosquitos that are hatching out on the water.  Go for an good starter mix that covers the bases and see what works where you're fishing. Tip: Turn over a few large rocks and see what bugs are under them. That's what the fish are eating in the area.

    ManMade Recommended:

    Go somewhere local and get some hand-tied versions of what's common in the area. This is not something you should just grab online.

     

    5. The Rest:

    Landing Net - The best way to get that fish safely off your line is with a compact net. If you plan on catch and release, or just want to make sure they don't jump the line at the last minute it's a useful way to make that happen. Go for a rubber net to make it easier to keep hooks from snagging in the mesh. ManMade Recommended: SF Landing Net ($30)

    Lanyard - A Lanyard keeps the little tools and flies you need close and safe. Go for a simple one that's set up to expand as you collect helpful accessories. ManMade Recommended:Dr. Slick Lanyard ($30)

     

    Credit: Fishpond
    Credit: Fishpond

     

    Tippet Holder - Having some different weight tippets at hand are important as you change out lines and flies. This simple holder keeps them safely secure, but right there when you need them. ManMade Recommended: Fishpond Headgate Tippet Holder ($20)

    Safety Tips:Always carry a knife. If you're wearing waders, keep that belt tight and be ready to cut it all loose if you get dragged down. It's a serious deal, and you need to be aware of the dangers. Rivers are cold, swift, and slippery. Be very sure of your footing, and use a wading support stick when you need to. Also, keep a dry set of clothes in the car, you're going to need them.

     

     


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    Kolaches: the ultimate breakfast food

    Lately, I've been on a quest to find better breakfast foods. Without getting into much personal, and overbearing, health details, most breakfast foods just aren't all that great for you. Whether it's a pile of dried wheat or a sugary toaster pastry, grabbing something good on the go can be so dang hard! Well, no more! Kolache to the rescue!

    I might be obsessed with these little guys. There's a great cafe here in Nashville that makes these, and it's not uncommon for me to grab one every Sunday. The kolach originates from the Czech Republic in the form of a sweet, fruit-filled pastry that can be found on most breakfast tables. In America, you can find their new origins in Texas as a spicy, smoked sausage and cheese filled dough. These are the ones we're going to focus on for your next breakfast! In honor of Breakfast Week here on ManMade, let's make some!

    Recipe

    • 1/2 ounce of Instant Yeast
    • 1/2 c of warm water
    • 1/2 c of butter
    • 1/4 c of sugar
    • 2 egg yolks
    • 2/3 Cup of whole milk (make sure it's whole)
    • 1.5 teaspoons of salt
    • 4 cups of flour (can sub half with whole wheat)
    • 1 package of diced fully-cooked smoked sausages
    • 8 ounces of shredded cheese
    • 1 sliced jalapeño 

    Kolaches: the ultimate breakfast food

     

    1. Make The Dough

    Bloom the yeast by mixing it with the warm water. Set aside for 15-20 minutes.

    Next, using a whisk or mixer cream together the butter and sugar.

    Add salt, egg yolks, water/yeast mixture and milk. 

    Once everything is incorporated, add flour until it's a sticky dough ball. 

    Once it's formed into a ball, cover and let double in size for 1-2 hours. I like to let my dough mature in the fridge for a couple of days. This develops the flavor you might find in sourdough or a good pizza dough.

    Kolaches: the ultimate breakfast food

    2. Make the Balls

    When you're ready to make the kolache, preheat your oven to 425 degrees. After the dough has risen, pinch off and roll golfball sized balls. Set them on a greased tray to let rise again for another 30-45 minutes.

    Kolaches: the ultimate breakfast food

    Kolaches: the ultimate breakfast food

    3. Fill them!

    Roll out each ball into a small disk. Set it in the palm of your hand and fill it with a small helping of diced sausages, a teaspoon of cheese and a slice of jalapeño (if you like it spicy!). At this point, you can practically fill them with anything you want! I've used scrambled eggs and bacon, pepperoni and parmesan and breakfast sausage and cheese. The possibilities are up to you! 

    Once you've put your fillings in your palm, pinch up all the ends to make it look like a small pouch. Set the ball on your baking sheet seam side down.

    Be sure to signify which ones have jalapeños in them. You don't want that to be a surprise one morning! I placed a small slice on the top.

    Kolaches: the ultimate breakfast food

    4. Bake!

    Brush each kolach with melted butter and stick in a 425 degree oven for 8-10 minutes.

    Kolaches: the ultimate breakfast food

    5. Eat!

    If you can keep yourself from eating every one of these you can place the rest in a storage container and put them in the fridge for breakfast the next day. Now you're set up for an entire week of breakfasts! 

     

    It's Breakfast Week on ManMade! See more posts here. 

     


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