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    This morning, I was scanning a studio tour of Natalie Davis, who runs Canoe, a leather working shop in Austin, Texas. I stumbled across this wood tool organizer and immediately exclaimed (well, in my head), "Oh my goodness, do I need one of those." I'm not sure if its something sold particularly for leather tools (I couldn't find anything at the Tandy website), but its certainly something that'd be easy to make.

    Just grab a squarish block of wood - a pine 4x4 post or a basswood carving block, and decide how you'd like your tools organized. You can use this for anything from colored pencils to paint brushes to papercrafting supplies to even your lady's makeup scenario. Use a flexible tape or calipers to measure the diameter, then add a 1/8" and start drilling away. Keep things on the grid, and if you can borrow or use a drill press, you'll make quick work of this. 

    Then, rub everything with an oil finish or stain, and clear coat it if it'll be around messy materials. Come up with the right system to keep your stuff organized, and you're good to go. 

    For the rest of Natalie's studio tour, check out A Day in the Life of Canoe Austin [DesignSponge.com]

     

     


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    created at: 07/22/2014

    Some guys have their go-to libation: no matter the time, no matter the place, they want this beer or that drink, and the matter really isn't up for discussion. Others are constantly switching up their poisons, perusing the menu for familiar flavors, taking the advice of the bartender, or simply having what everyone else at the table ordered.

    Then, there's the rest of us; those that I describe as the seasonal explorers, who take different chunks of time to learn about a certain style of beer, a region of wine, or a family of cocktails. They never order the same glass twice, because the goal isn't reliability, it's the adventure of comparing a variety of options to learn about what goes into the Platonic ideal of said glass-filler.    


    For these people, allow ManMade to suggest - this summer, you should be drinking: a Daiquiri. 

    Really? Really.

    We don't know when the Daiquiri started to be associated with slushy bright red things served in fish bowls with umbrellas...probably sometime in the 70s, when the margarita fell to the same icy fate. Classically, a daiquiri is nothing more than rum, some sugar, and fresh lime, and it's a damn good drink for hot weather. 

    Dale Degroff reports, in The Craft of the Cocktail

    This Cuban classic gets its name from the town of the same name in the Oriente province. The recipe was created by an American mining engineer named Jennings Cox and a Cuban engineer name Pagliuchi in the late nineteenth century. The talented barmen in Havana...further refined it. The Daiquri made its first appearance in the United States at the Army Navy Club in Washington, D.C., taken there from Cuba by Admiral Lucius Johnson. Today, you can [still] have a daiquiri in the Army Navy club's Daiquiri Lounge. 

    The drink is essentially a 'rum sour' and follows a classic sour ratio. Here's the original recipe.

    Classic Daiquiri 

    • 1 1/2 oz light rum (try the very affordable Flor de Caña)
    • 1 oz simple syrup
    • 3/4 oz fresh lime juice.

     

    Shake with ice and serve up in a chilled glass. 

     

    created at: 07/22/2014

    A Daiquiri was the well-publicized favorite cocktail of Ernest Hemingway, who apparently liked to double the rum and hold the sugar. He enjoyed his Daiquiris at the Floridita lounge in Havana, where they added a bit of fresh grapefruit and maraschino liqueur. This take was dubbed the Papa Doble - Papa's Double - but, in Hemingway's proportions, is a rather intense quaff. So, here's the standard Floridita Daquiri No. 3 as it was served to everyone else.

    Papa Doble - Floridita Daquiri No. 3

    • 1 1/2 oz white rum
    • 1/4 oz maraschino liqueur, such as Luxardo
    • 1/2 oz fresh grapefruit
    • 3/4 oz simple syrup
    • 3/4 oz fresh lime juice

     

    Shake all ingredients with ice and serve up or in a glass filled with crushed ice. I only have 4 oz. cocktail/martini glasses, so with a bigger drink like this, I tend to enjoy it on the rocks. Plus, I like how the drink changes over time as the ice melts, and stays super cold throughout. Also, if you're on the fence about getting maraschino liqueur just for a drink like this, do it. It's a great addition to lots of mixed drinks, and will last in your home bar forever. 

     

    Have you ever had a legit Daiquri? Tell us your thoughts in the comments below.

     

    Oh, and here's a nice social media-friendly image, all formatted up with text and such. Please feel free to Pin It or share with your friends.

    created at: 07/22/2014 


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    Each Wednesday, I post some of my favorite can't-miss links, images, and otherwise mindblowing goodies from across the web.

    A chef's knife should be the sort of thing you buy once in your life, and use everyday.With that in mind, Gear Patrol rounded up six recommended options, in a variety of styles and price ranges.

     

    created at: 07/23/2014I really like how Hombre McSteezis using the Instagram language to create fun works of art. 

     

    The Purl Bee offers a cool tutorialfor a basic and easy "railroad" style tote bag. A good and practical first sewing project. 

    created at: 07/23/2014

    The New York Times columnist Mark Bittman looks at the true cost of cheeseburger. 

     

    I can't wait to watch the entire thing. FARANG: The Story of Chef Andy Ricker of Pok Pok Thai Empire


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    In my line o' work, I'm lucky to come across hundreds of creative DIY projects and ideas each week, and I'm always inspired. But every once in a while, I discover a truly clever project that reminds me why I do this work in the first place, and gets my DIY heart all aflutter. This is one of them.   

    This project was submitted to the Food52 Best Kitchen Hacks contest in 2012 (it took third place). The creator created a cold smoker - an object which smokes food without heating it, and thereby cooking it - from a basic food can and some wood chips. 

    Rather than just punching some holes in the can and filling it with fuel and lighting it on fire - which would, of course, create heat and therefore be a "hot smoker," she came up with this solution: fill the can with woodchips designed for smoking, and slowly keeps them smoldering safely...with a soldering iron. Genius!

    She uses the tight fitting lid of her gas grill to keep things safely contained. Seriously - I straight up love this, and can't wait to give it a try. It'd be a great way to smoke some cocktails!

    How to: Make Your Own DIY Smoked Cocktails

     

    Check out the full how-to at Food52: How to Hack a Cold Smoker

     

     


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    For many projects, a proper tool box is overkill, plus your tools just bounce around inside, unorganized. To keep track of a dedicated set of tools for a particular type of projects, while keeping things organized, consider a custom tool roll. 

    Instructable user nomuse offers a super, basic-level sewing tutorial to whip one up. He says, "If you are like me, you end up with a lot of little hand tools cluttering up the gig bag. And if you have access to a sewing machine, a few hours of work can save a remarkable amount of hassle later on. I did this thing to learn more about my new Bernina, but it has paid for itself many times over in the sheer convenience of keeping everything I need sorted and easy to transport to the theater."

    Get the full how-to at Instructables: A Simple Tool Roll

     


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    In my line o' work, I'm lucky to come across hundreds of creative DIY projects and ideas each week, and I'm always inspired. But every once in a while, I discover a truly clever project that reminds me why I do this work in the first place, and gets my DIY heart all aflutter. This is one of them.   

    This project was submitted to the Food52 Best Kitchen Hacks contest in 2012 (it took third place). The creator created a cold smoker - an object which smokes food without heating it, and thereby cooking it - from a basic food can and some wood chips. 

    Rather than just punching some holes in the can and filling it with fuel and lighting it on fire - which would, of course, create heat and therefore be a "hot smoker," she came up with this solution: fill the can with woodchips designed for smoking, and slowly keeps them smoldering safely...with a soldering iron. Genius!

    She uses the tight fitting lid of her gas grill to keep things safely contained. Seriously - I straight up love this, and can't wait to give it a try. It'd be a great way to smoke some cocktails!

    How to: Make Your Own DIY Smoked Cocktails

     

    Check out the full how-to at Food52: How to Hack a Cold Smoker

     

     


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    Scott didn't know how tough he was. Then one day, life tested him. An accident changed his life forever, but it didn't take away his spirit. With a supportive team and a drive to push the limits of what was possible, he went on to compete in one of the world's toughest races—the Ironman.


    Millions of people come through the doors at a Holiday Inn every year. Every one of them is on a journey. Every one of them has a story to tell. Learn more about some of these extraordinary guests here 

    Brought to you by Holiday Inn, making your journey extraordinary.


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    A perfect - and curiously engaging - video to watch on a summer afternoon.    "Creamlapse" is a time-lapse montage video of frozen treats slowly melting by Mateo Cabeza. Set to Bobby Vinton's "Mr. Lonely," the whole thing has, interestingly, a David Lynch-ish vibe to it, and I can't stop watching it. 

    via Laughing Squid

     

     


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    created at: 07/24/2014

    The Altoids Tin kit is a DIY classic. I'm almost nostlagic for the early days of the make/hack/indie craft blogosphere, where it seemed like every week, there was a new project and collection of stuff you can smush into one of these ubiquitous containers.

    But, throwback-ish or not, it's also a darn good project, and something to consider keeping anywhere you might need it: your daily go bag, your glove compartment, your camping gear, etc. 

    Wes Siler of Gizmodo says,

    Tiny, light and infinitely transportable, this affordable little kit might save your life in an emergency. Here's how to build your own mini survival kit and how to use the stuff in it. Why Altoids? The tins are universally available, well made and designed to keep the stuff inside them intact and safe from crushing. With a little work, you can even make them waterproof. They're also designed to ride in a pocket or glove box, under the seat of a motorcycle or even on a knife sheath.

    You can go fancier and build a kit in a small Otterbox waterproof case, but the whole idea here is to create something small enough that you have no excuse not to carry it and cheap enough that you have no excuse not to make one. The items...[are] small, light, works-in-a-pinch stuff, intended to give you a diverse level of extra capability should you find yourself stuck somewhere with nothing else to rely on. The kit will work best when paired with a rugged survival knife. 

    Check out the how-to in full at Lifehacker: ​How To Build Your Own Altoids Tin Survival Kit

     

     


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    When I was a young man, I worked my fair share of restaurant server jobs, in which I was required to wear a 100% cotton, white Oxford cloth, dry-cleaned only, and heavily starched. As anyone who's actually carried very many plates covered in leftover sauce wearing a white shirt on a double shift, you needed to own at least four to five of these guys for use in an average week.

    Needless to say, none of my shirts ever got dry cleaned or starched (save for that spray can of Niagara), and after realized what happened to real Oxford cloth after wearing for fifteen minutes, none of them were a 100% cotton, either.   But, the experience, on the whole, was character building, for sure, and it served as my intro to buying dress shirts, rather than just finding and ironing the ones my mom bought for me in junior high. 

    And while I can read a tag pretty well, and know the difference between a cotton and synthetic blend, I still don't actually know what Oxford cloth really means. Or for that matter, poplin, broadcloth, twill, or pinpoint.

    created at: 07/28/2014

    Enter this shirt fabric primer from Dappered. They share the proper vocabulary, along with some distinguishing features and some helpful close-up photos of fabric textures, and - most hopefully - some practical use scenarios for each type. 

    Check it out here: A Primer On Shirt Fabrics – Poplin vs. Pinpoint vs. Twill & more


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    In the summer (and the winter, if you can swing it), there's no better tool for cooking homemade pizza than your outdoor grill. It's simply the hottest domestic heat source you can get your hands on, and turns out that crispy, smokey charred crust that makes great pizza actually great. (Note: works awesome for your wok, too.)

    Cambria from The Kitchn recently an outdoor party, and discover some great tips for using the high heat to your advantage, not just for burning it, and a two-zone fire to get it perfect, every time. 

    By the way - those black bits? That's what you going for. 

    Check it out: 5 Tips for Better Grilled Pizza [The Kitchn]

     


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    created at: 07/29/2014

    The high five is a clear communicative gesture. While you can shake hands with someone you might not really agree with or downright loathe at the time, the high five is reserved for someone with whom you're on the same page. Even if it's after a small disagreement, the resolute high five communicates that, at the end of the day, your a team.

    So, where did the high five come from?           

    Turns out, it's not as old as you might think. And while it's probably not the first time two people decide to slap some elevated hands, it's certainly the first time it was recorded, and the man who made it happen has a story worth telling. 

    created at: 07/29/2014

    Award-winning director Michael Jacobs created "The High Five" as part of the ESPN/Grantland 30 for 30 documentary short series. "When Dusty Baker hit his 30th home run for the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1977, the first man to greet him at home plate was his friend and teammate, rookie Glenn Burke. Overcome with happiness, Burke did the first thing that came to mind — he put his hand straight in the air and had Baker slap it. Welcome to the birth of the high five."

    Watch Jacobs film at Grantland – 30 for 30 Shorts: ‘The High Five’


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    Maybe I'm getting old. Maybe I've been overly influenced by those images of the dad in Calvin and Hobbes or Homer Simpson. Perhaps it's those memorable times I've spent in Latin America, where they really know how to use 'em. Or maybe - hopefully not, but maybe - it's all those completely and horribly generic Father's Day cards I have to pick through each June to find the right one for my dad.

    But, I think a hammock is a damn fine way to spend a summer evening, and every man should have one.       I've seen the selections at the home centers and the garden stores, and, truth be told, most are super duper ugly and incredibly expensive. So, since this is a site dedicated to helping guys make the stuff they use every day, I thought I'd find a couple easy-to-follow tutorials that will help you whip up the exact style that works for your needs. 

    But first - if you're not inclined to bust out the ripstop, rope, or sewing machine and actually make your own, you can buy affordable hammocks designed for ultralight travel and backpacking at your local outdoor store for $30-60. Here's a well-reviewed option at Amazon. 

    1. [Pictured at top] A classic knotted rope design, created with an overhand knot. See the full tutorial by Jen Vitale and Laura Dart at Kinfolk. 

    2. A weather proof rip-stop option, that involves some basic sewing and seams. 

     

    3. This one's incredibly simple, using materials you probably already have: a blanket and some rope. Get the tutorial and links from Apartment Therapy.

     

    4. A more permanent solution created from a dropcloth, chain, and other fixings from the home improvement store. 

     

    5. A framed option from Little Dog Vintage using heavy canvas, grommets, and some wooden stretchers. This one's a great option for two. 

     

     

    created at: 07/29/2014

    6. A primitive/survival style tutorialmade from cordage and a tarp, a poncho, or even a bed sheet.  

     

    7. A size-customizable hammock using just a bit of sewing and some very affordable materials. This one's a great combo of both the basic and reinforced styles. See the full tutorial at Outside Mom.

     

    created at: 07/29/2014

    8.Claire from CamilleStyles makes a more advanced designwith a bit of knotting, some fabric, and hardware store parts. The fabric choices here are pretty feminine, but the technique is solid. Or, make one for a special woman in your life. 

    9. A reusable camping style hammock, complete with a mosquito net and double layer that allows you to include a sleeping pad. Find the tutorial at DIY Gear Supply. 


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    With the FIFA World Cup(TM) as the international stage, Johnson & Johnson looked to make the world a more caring place through Care Inspires Care(TM). From shining a spotlight on community members who do extraordinary acts of care for others to blood donations that helped to save lives, with all acts big and small in the past two years, you helped to contribute to more than 25 million acts of care and a more caring world.

    Let's celebrate our achievements together and continue to spread more care in the world! Our aspiration as a company is to care for the world, one person at a time. Our YouTube channel provides you an unprecedented look behind the scenes at Johnson & Johnson, spotlighting the people, stories and causes that inspire us to care.

    This post brought to you by Johnson & Johnson.

    Johnson & Johnson Logo


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    Each Wednesday, I post some of my favorite can't-miss links, images, and otherwise mindblowing goodies from across the web.

    Colorado-based illustrator Ryan Putham pays homage to some of his favorite film characters by laying out their most iconic accessories  and clothing. Above is Yukon Cornelius, and here's a little Marty McFly: 

    See them all at RyanPutn.am [via CreativeBloq]

     

    Your favorite summer cocktail... in popsicle form.

     

    created at: 07/30/2014It's the 25th anniversary of the Beastie Boys album Paul's Boutique, and Tim Carmody celebrates in some seriously good ways on Kottke.org. 

     

    Apparently, most carrots used to be purple. And didn't really exist before the 16th century. Check out their interesting history at The Kitchn.

     

    This dude built a Pizza Kettle clone for only $20 in parts. "All you need is a roll of steel flashing, 8"x25', four 6" lag or carriage bolts, and two 3" hex bolts. Scrap wood for handles and a tin snips." 

     

     


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    Huh. The Daily Beast shares that most bottles of 'craft' whiskey - those determined by branding using phrases like "small batch," "handcrafted," "artisanal," and always with a local designation, probably come from a huge, macro distillery in Southern Indiana.   This makes sense, of course. Kinda. Small upstart producers have to learn to distill, perfect their mashbills, and age for at least two years (probably more like four or seven,) before even having a finished product to try.

    The truth lies in this paragraph:

    Lawrenceburg, Indiana... is home to a massive brick complex that cranks out mega-industrial quantities of beverage-grade alcohol. The factory, once a Seagram distillery, has changed hands over the decades and was most recently acquired by food-ingredient corporation MGP. It is now a one-stop shop for marketers who want to bottle their own brands of spirits without having to distill the product themselves. MGP sells them bulk vodka and gin, as well as a large selection of whiskies, including bourbons of varying recipes, wheat whiskey, corn whiskey, and rye.... Their products are well-made, but hardly what one thinks of as artisanal. And yet, much of the whiskey now being sold as the hand-crafted product of micro-distilleries actually comes from this one Indiana factory.

    It's a pretty fascinating look at the industry, and what it takes to make spirits in the US. Definitely worth a read: The artisan whiskey industry has a big secret—many of the ‘small-batch’ distillers are actually buying their product from a large factory in Indiana.

     


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    They say the key to a great steak is a great crust. And the key to a great crust is lots of high, direct heat. And the key to lots of high, direct heat? A stream of flowing lava, of course.   

    DesignBoom shares the story of "a BBQ like you’ve never seen before: London-based creative duo Bompas & Parr has staged a cook out on an artificial volcano and within a high voltage laboratory, searing their steaks in seconds with lava and lightning."

    When you're working with 2100°, there's not much need for the grill to pre-heat, I guess. 

     

    Check out the full photo series and video at DesignBoom: bompas & parr sear steaks in seconds with lava and lightning

     

     


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    One of the single most direct ways to get outside more this summer, take more trips, and spend more time exploring: take less stuff. After all, the point of hiking, camping, and backpacking is to get away from material things in the first place. And whether you want to spend a few nights in the woods, or tackle a specific, well-loved thru-hiking route - you don't need 75 lbs worth of stuff on your back (and your feet) to do it. 

    Ultralight backpacking is a technique and a philosophy, but you don't have to cut off toothbrush handles and drill holes in your gear only. It's simply about using a selective set of safe and appropriate gear wisely, so you can go farther, faster, and get out more often. 

    created at: 07/31/2014

    The team at Gear Patrol have begun a great new series to help you get set up. This primer begins the series, and they've also suggested a list of essentials with specific recommendations.

    Stay tuned. This should be a good one. FARTHER, FASTER: A PRIMER ON ULTRALIGHT BACKPACKING [GearPatrol.com]

     


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    created at: 08/01/2014

    A stretched canvas is - poetically and literally - a blank space on which to apply original creative works: paintings, screen prints, photo transfers, spray painted stencils. They're a great way to add some custom wall art to your space, matched to the vibe of the room, it's color scheme, etc. Making your own not only saves you money (it does), but has another, and more important benefit: you can make your canvas whatever size you need. You're not limited to the standard sizes, and you can build what you need to fill that empty space on your wall, making your art work not only in style, but in scale. Win, win, win. 

    created at: 08/01/2014

    Dark Rye, the online magazine from grocer Whole Foods, has a complete how-to for this relatively simple DIY project. Connect your stretchers, staple the canvas, and make some art!

    DIY Workshop: How to Stretch Your Own Canvas

     

     


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    created at: 08/01/2014

    Summer is the best time for trying all kinds of new, cold drinks. While winter drinks almost always warm you up, summer cocktails are much more context-specific: are you hanging out in the backyard on super hot day? Enjoying an early evening cookout? Staying out for fire-lit evening? There's the right drink for that.    The NYTimes.com teamed up with bartender Rosie Schaap to create the "What Are You Drinking?" generator, allowing you to select the style and setting for your cocktail, as well as which summer-y spirit on which you'd like it based. 

    It's fun to click around and try different ideas, and the "see all cocktails" page will actually allow you to peruse all the options and decide what sounds tastiest given the ingredients you have on hand.

    Use it this weekend! What Are You Drinking?[NYTimes.com]

     

     

     

     


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