Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


older | 1 | 2 | 3 | (Page 4) | 5 | 6 | .... | 122 | newer

    0 0

    created at: 04/18/2013

    So...you have a huge blank space on your wall staring at you everyday. You don't know what to do with it, but know that buying an original piece that size is way out of your budget. What do you do? Of course, you make your own.

    Purchasing art can be a daunting task, especially if you dislike visiting home-decor stores, having to browse through endless aisles of not-so-rad art. We get you. 

    In this tutorial by Oh Happy Day, you can see how easy it is to create prints and posters using your favorite images. All you gotta do is:

    • Choose a high-res photo (judging by the tutorial, a 612 X 792 px image will do)
    • Take it to your nearest Kinkos and ask them to print it poster size (if needed, you can ask a friendly rep to resize it for you).
    • Frame it and you're good to go

    The results will be a large-scale, black and white print, similar to the architectural art seen in Chris Warnes' home in the photo above.  If you want to avoid the hassle (and cost) of framing, you could use some metal clips instead. Simple and affordable.

    Your walls, and your wallet, will be as happy as a clam.

    Top Image: Chris Warnes [Via Design*Sponge]


    0 0

    Each Wednesday, I post some of my favorite can't-miss links, images, and otherwise mindblowing goodies from across the web. 

    A fun and informative flow chart that details the various ways that time travel works in film.    If you're curious, I think the way time travel works Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure makes the most sense to me and gets it nearly correct with causality loops, etc. And, I still think Primer is awesome. 

    Time Travel in Movies by Mr. Dalliard via I Love Charts 

    A chocolate cookie in a cup recipe: intended for two servings, which you "bake" in the microwave. Done!

     

     

    Awesome Rube Goldberg and domino music video for A-Trak and Tommy Trash's "Tuna Melt"

     

    "Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo" is a grammatically valid sentence in English. I can't believe I'm just finding out about this.

    A Southern triple threat - Coke, peanut, and Tennessee whiskey cocktail: The Tallulah 

     


    0 0

    Though it's the way most of us consume them, salsas are not just for chips. That limitation is a shame, because these Mexican table sauces can be so much more than watery blend of canned tomatoes and vinegar intended for scoping.I was born in Mexico, so fresh, bright and bold salsas are close to my heart. 

    created at: 04/24/2013

    So, join me on a virtual south-of-the-border trip, and learn the basic techniques of making the perfect homemade salsa.

    The term salsa - which basically means "sauce" in Spanish - is usually used to describe a tangy mix of tomatoes, onions, and peppers, but its origins and varieties go way beyond that. Salsas have been around for a really long time - think Spaniards wearing conquistador clothes and Aztecs grinding fresh ingredients in a Molcajete. They have been a staple in Latin cuisine for generations, so you can only imagine how many recipes have been created!

    The concept is simple - use the right ingredients that complement each other well, and don't over complicate things. Here's the process, broken down into a few, basic steps. Take note!

    STEP 1: Choose the ingredients. Chiles (fresh or dried), a base, and seasonings. That's it. As long as you have a base (e.g. roma tomatoes, tomatillos, pineapple) you'll only need a few complementary elements like cilantro, onion, and lime.

    STEP 2: Prepare the ingredients. Roasted, smoked, raw - whatever floats your boat. Each method will dramatically change the flavor in your recipe, so feel free to experiment.

    STEP 3: Finish him! The salsa, I mean. There are 2 basic methods: pureed or chunky. Think about how you're going to serve it: on top of fish, in tacos, with roasted pork, etc, and pick a texture to match.

    Now, let's talk about the most common cooking and finishing techniques:

     

    THE ROASTED

    created at: 04/24/2013

    This method adds more depth of flavour and is perfect to complement any grilled dish, and adds complexity to winter dishes cooked indoors. What you'll need:

    • Roasting pan
    • Canola oil
    • Salt and pepper

    Gather your ingredients, place them in a pan, and rub them with some love and canola oil. Season with salt and pepper. Place them under your broiler or - if you have a gas stove - roast them directly on the flame. Once the skin starts to char, remove from heat and place them in a paper bag, clean cloth, or sealable container. Let them "sweat" until they cool down a little.

    Once they're cool enough to handle, take them out of the bag/cloth and remove excess char. Finish according to recipe. 

    Bonus tip: If you want lots of heat, roll your whole roasted chiles on a chopping board - this will release the oil in the seeds and it'll send you straight to picante town.

    THE RAW

    created at: 04/22/2013

    This method is recommended if you want to keep the tanginess of the fresh ingredients in the salsa. It's also great for quick summer snacks and low-fat diets. I suggest you use really ripe ingredients, otherwise your salsa will lack flavor. Got an avocado that's about to go kaput? Or maybe some fresh tomatoes from the garden? Use them up and get ready to have a fiesta in your kitchen!

     

    CHUNK

    created at: 04/22/2013

    Just like the raw method, this one is a breeze to make. Chop, chop, chop, and away you go. If your knife skills suck, don't worry! The chunkier it is, the more rustic it looks. Chunky salsas (made fresh at home) last for about 3 or 4 days in the fridge, before they start to break down. Try to prepare these at least an hour ahead so the ingredients can mingle.

    PUREE

    created at: 04/21/2013

    Let your food processor do the magic for you. This is probably the most popular method in Mexico. It's easier to serve, and also allows you to freeze any leftovers. To make it extra smooth, strain your mix to collect any seeds or veggie skins.

    Now, to put these techniques into practice, check out my recipes for five distinct and flavorful salsas. Perfect for Cinco de Mayo, or anytime!

     

     


    0 0

    Many of my earliest creative memories are sitting on that awful burnt orange rug in our basement floor, listening to LPs on my brown plastic Fisher Price record player, and putting together [seemingly] elaborate edifices with construction toys. Honestly, though the specifics have been slightly updated, it's basically how I spent last evening - in the basement, listening to music, and putting stuff together.

    See, both my parents were science teachers, and I always had many more engineering-style toys than action figures, and while many kids love their LEGOs, I was always into the (sadly discontinued) Construx and Ramagons, and that kinetic masterpiece, the Erector set.   This year marks the 100th anniversary of when the first Erector set went on the market. The New York Times details its history, and the people who still love it today.

    Erector Sets were the invention of a commuter, Alfred Carlton Gilbert, who had started a company that manufactured props for magicians. The non-hocus-pocus inspiration struck in 1912. “Gilbert was traveling into New York when they were electrifying” the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad, said William Brown, an expert on Gilbert in Hamden, Conn. Gilbert looked out the window and saw workers riveting the steel beams of a power-line tower. “He saw the girders in the tower,” Mr. Brown said, “and that was that.” Gilbert switched from making magic to making metal parts — little girders, little wheels for pulleys, little gears, little engines — and big money....

    “Veterans of the Erector generation find a vague incompleteness in the ease and precision of Lego construction,” [William] Brown wrote on Web site of the Eli Whitney Museum, of which he is the director. “Nothing in Lego matches the test of the Ferris wheel’s improbable rim, which was constructed of 13 rather than the logical 12 segments. Gilbert the magician seemed to want to be sure you were watching very closely. The bolder the challenge to be mastered, the sweeter the satisfaction.” 

    Read more about this great, timeless construction toy at 100 Years Later, Seeing the Influence of the Erector Set 

     

    What were your favorite construction toys as a kid? Let us know in the comments below.

     

     

     


    0 0

    Sharpologist - a new site devoted to the art of traditional shaving - explores the subculture of barbershops, those who choose to seek out shaving and grooming practice as an art, rather than a matter of routine.   They reference an interesting video from Thrash Lab, which explores the new wave of traditional-style barbershops in L.A., frequented by young men of all kinds of backgrounds, and the relationships that develop between a barber and his clientele. And that's the interesting thing here, for me at least: it's not about trendiness or straight razors or nostalgia - it's about the connection between people. Sure, that could happen at SuperCuts, but it's great to see the re-emergence of the barbershop as a new "third place" for modern men, and that these facilities seek to foster those relationships, in addition to giving a great shave. 

    The Sub Culture of Barbershops [Sharpologist]

     

     


    0 0

     created at: 04/24/2013

    Ahh...salsas. From quick and fresh to spicy and smoky, they're packed with lots of flavor and I love every version. Whether you want to celebrate Cinco de Mayo with traditional Mexican flavors, or just want to up the ante on a weeknight meal, we've create five go-to recipes that can work for all kinds of occasions.  So grab your chiles, and a knife,  and join us in the kitchen.

    Before we get started, you should definitely check this post we published earlier this week where we talk about cooking techniques and other tips. If you're already familiar with the anatomy of a salsa, then let's get it.

    created at: 04/22/2013

    SALSA AL PASTOR

    This salsa is perfect for slow-roasted pork tacos. Grilled pineapple chunks come to life when you mix them with the smokiness of chipotle peppers. A match made in heaven!

    Serves 4-6

    Ingredients:

    • 1 fresh pineapple - cored and cut in slices
    • 1/2 cup of chopped red onion
    • 1 jalapeno - seeded
    • 1 chipotle pepper from a can - Note: use only 1 chili, not 1 whole can! Or you'll need to call the fire dept.
    • Salt and pepper

    Start by grilling the pineapple. You can either use a BBQ or your oven's broiler. Once they're nice and grilled, removed them from the heat and let them cool down completely. On a separate dish, mash the chipotle pepper until you form a paste. 

    Cut the grilled pineapple in chunks and add the rest of the ingredients. Season with salt and pepper. Mix and you're done.

    This salsa will last for a couple days in the fridge, so try to use it as quickly as possible.

    created at: 04/22/2013

    SALSA ASADA (Roasted Salsa)

    This salsa is magnificent when served with rotisserie chicken. Add a few pickled onions, and you're set for success.

    Serves 4-6

    Ingredients:

    • 1 chili poblano
    • 1 jalapeno
    • 4 cloves of garlic
    • 4 roma tomatoes
    • 1 handful of cilantro
    • Salt and pepper

    Start by roasting your ingredients. Grab some olive or canola oil, rub it on all of your veggies, sprinkle some salt and place in a broiler or BBQ. Let them get nice and charred. Once they're good to go, place them in a plastic bag or clean cloth and let them "sweat". Once they're cool enough to handle, take any excess char off (you can rinse them a bit under running water).

    Seed your chilies and place all ingredients in a food processor. Puree. Adjust seasoning and enjoy! This salsa can be served hot or cold, depending on your dish.

    created at: 04/22/2013

    SALSA PICO DE GALLO

    This is the most common type of salsa. It's a crowd pleaser at parties, game nights, or just as a light snack. Don't forget to get some chips for this one!

    Serves 4-6

    Ingredients:

    • 5 roma tomatoes
    • 1/2 of a cup of chopped white onion (you can use less if you don't like it so onion-y)
    • 1 handful of cilantro
    • Juice of 3 limes
    • 2 jalapeno or serrano peppers - seeded and chopped

    Chop all ingredients - chunky style - and place them in a bowl. Squeeze your limes on top and mix. Adjust seasoning, and boom! It's fiesta time! How easy was that?

    created at: 04/22/2013

    SALSA MACHA

    This is a hybrid between a salsa and a rub. It can be used to flavor soups or stews, or - if you mix it with some low-fat mayo and sour cream - you can serve it as a dip. This salsa is definitely spicy! So be careful, a little goes a long way.

    Serves 4-6

    Ingredients:

    • Dried chipotle peppers
    • Dried pasilla and/or ancho peppers
    • 1/3 cup of walnuts
    • 3 cloves of garlic
    • olive oil
    • Salt and pepper

    Remove stems from chillies and put them in a pan with garlic and walnuts. Add a bit of oil and toast them on low heat. Toast until you can smell the fragrant chilies. Don't over do it or chillies could turn bitter. Remove from the heat and let the mix cool down for a bit.

    Toss all ingredients in a food processor and pulse. Add a bit of olive oil until it looks like a coarse pesto. Adjust seasoning and serve!

    created at: 04/22/2013

    SALSA VERDE WITH AVOCADO

    The perfect companion for fish or shredded chicken tacos. It's tangy, mild, and super fresh.

    Serves 4-6

    Ingredients:

    • 1 ripe avocado
    • 5 tomatillos (or 1 small can of tomatillo puree)
    • 1 serrano pepper - seeded
    • 1 handful of cilantro (can substitute with parsley)
    • 1 tbsp of white wine vinegar
    • Salt and pepper

    Cut avocado in half. Remove seed. Scoop out the avocado from the peel and put it in a food processor. Remove stem from tomatillos (if they come with the peel, take that off too, it's not edible). Add them to the avocado along with the seeded serrano, cilantro, vinegar, salt and pepper. Pulse to puree. Serve.

    With these five recipes under your sleeve, you are ready to entertain for the rest of the year. Got any favorites of your own? Share them on the comments below!

     

    For more on salsa making techniques - check our Skillset guide - How to: Make the Perfect Homemade Salsa 


    0 0

    created at: 04/18/2013

    For any DIY enthusiast, the clearance bin at the DIY store is a regular stop. This project, the Oddstock Floored Wardrobe was designed and built to take advantage of that bin. Brazilian teak prefinished hardwood flooring was found on clearance for an irresistible price. The box had apparently been returned from a large flooring job.

    To make use of all the boards, they were cut to short, mitered pieces and arranged in a chevron pattern. Metal tile flooring dividers were used to hide the board edges, trimming out the doors. A simple box deep enough to house clothes on hangers was placed on Queen Anne legs for a romantic look. After many searches for the right door handles, utilitarian garage door handles were chosen because of their large size and casual appearance. A coat hook and mirror were added to the inside of the door for accessories.

    You can change the look to be more modern by using straight legs instead. Fill the bottom with shoes or boxes and add shelves if you like, or try other types of wood flooring and experiment with different patterns. This project comes from the excellent book DIY Furniture: A Step-by-Step Guide by Christopher Stuart. Thanks to Laurence King and Chronicle Books for sharing it with us. If you'd like to win a free copy of the book, check out the giveaway info at the bottom of the post! 

     

     

    Materials and Tools

    • Two sheets of 3/4" plywood x 48 x 96in. Here cabinet-grade birch is used.
    • Sheet of 1/4" plywood  x 48 x 96in. Here cabinet-grade birch is used.
    • Sheet of 1/2" MDF  x 48 x 96in
    • Box of tongue-and-groove hardwood flooring (here Brazilian teak), 3/8 x 3 x at least 10in
    • Metal clothes rail, 1 ¼ in diameter, at least 38 ½ in long (part L)
    • Set of brass clothes rail holders, ¼ in diameter (part M)
    • Four wooden Queen Anne style legs (part I), length 28in
    • Four metal tile flooring dividers, 3/8 in profile x 1/16 in metal thickness x 75 in long (part J). (The profile hides the flooring edges. Match the profile height to your flooring thickness.)
    • Two brass utility door handles, 6 ½ in long (part O)
    • Four pairs of brass ball catches (part N)
    • Screws 1/2–1 ¼ in long
    • Small nails
    • Four corner plates and mounting hardware for table legs (part K)
    • Two brass piano hinges, 1 ½ in wide when open, 72 in long (part P)
    • Wood glue and gel super glue with activator
    • Screwdriver
    • Drill
    • Hacksaw
    • Hammer
    • Small nail gun or headless pin nailer
    • Countersink bit
    • Plug cutter

    created at: 04/18/2013

     

    created at: 04/18/2013

     

    created at: 04/18/2013

    created at: 04/18/2013

    created at: 04/18/2013

    created at: 04/18/2013

    created at: 04/18/2013

    created at: 04/18/2013

    created at: 04/18/2013

    created at: 04/18/2013

    created at: 04/18/2013

     


    0 0

    Pour over is one of coffee's simplest methods, and one of the most preferred by tasters and coffee geeks. You simply pour heated water over the ground beans through a filter...kinda like a drip machine, except it tastes way better.    

    Crafting the perfect cup requires just a few tools, and Jeremy has created this awesome buying guide walking you through the process of building the perfect gearlist. None of the items are terribly expensive, and that walnut and mason jar hand grinder will look pretty sweet next to a Chemex on anyone's kitchen counter. If you're committed to stepping up your coffee game to the next level, this seems like a very fine way to go.

    Kit: The Perfect Pour Over Coffee Set [Gear Patrol]

     

     


    0 0

    created at: 04/29/2013

    Every man's home or office needs a good place to stash the booze. Unless you have to hide it away in a desk drawer somewhere, I prefer to go the way of Mad Men and have it on display in the classiest way possible. Unfortunately, a nice bar cart can cost hundreds of dollars, so I decided to do a little hunting for an old Cosco cart I could repurpose into my own classy moonshine wagon.

    I lucked out and found a perfect cart at a yard sale for ten bucks. You see these kind of carts all of the time, and some need a little more work than others to fix up, but they are pretty easy to come by if you make the garage sale rounds. 

    created at: 04/29/2013

    Once you have a cart, all you need are a few accessories from IKEA and a couple cans of spray paint to make your own fully stocked bar cart. Here's what you will need:

    • Cosco Cart 
    • Set of 2 IKEA drawer pulls
    • IKEA wine glass rack
    • 3 IKEA silverware canisters
    • set of super strong magnets (like these)
    • 3 small zip ties
    • Spray paint
    • Your favorite liquor bottles
    • Glassware
    • Awesome decorative tchotchkes

    created at: 04/16/2013

    Start by cleaning your cart and prepping it for a new coat of paint. If your cart has any rust, go at it with some steel wool and sand paper to smooth out the surface. Wash down the entire surface area with soap and water and let it dry thoroughly. Here you have two options for painting - disassemble and paint individual pieces, or mask and paint as a whole. I wanted all of my screws to stay silver, so I chose the disassemble option and broke down my cart into 4 legs and 3 shelves by removing all of the hardware.

    created at: 04/16/2013

    Prior to painting the cart, I drilled new holes for the drawer pull handles that I wanted to add on each side. First, carefully measure the distance between the holes of your drawer pulls and mark where you are going to put them on the top shelf of your cart. I started with a small drill bit to get an indentation started in the metal, and then finished making the screw hole with an awl and a hammer. The drill is really just to get the hole started, and the awl will do the rest of the work. Once you have a small hole, the metal is easily bendable and you can easily increase the size of your hole by spinning your awl.

    created at: 04/16/2013

    created at: 04/16/2013

    Next, take your cart to a well ventilated area for spray painting. I went with navy blue, and I needed just over a single can of spray paint for full coverage. (Get two cans to be safe and avoid having to run back to the hardware store in the middle of the project.) Spray evenly across all surfaces of the metal, and let it dry fully before reassembling or unmasking.

    created at: 04/16/2013

    Once your cart is back together, add the drawer pulls to the top shelf. If you want to add a wine glass rack without screwing any more holes into the shelves, and your cart is metal, use high powered magnets. IKEA sells a wine glass rack for a few bucks, so I lined the top of it with 10 magnets (each is rated to hold 4 pounds) and adhered it to the bottom of the second shelf of my cart.

    created at: 04/16/2013

    created at: 04/16/2013

    Next put together your wince rack. Get your 3 IKEA canisters and line up the holes on the sides. Connect them through the holes using small zip ties. The zip tie is practically invisible once you tighten it and trim the excess, and can't be seen at all when the wine rack has bottles in it.

    created at: 04/16/2013

    created at: 04/16/2013

    Lastly, you are going to want to stock your bar with all of your favorite bottles of booze. I am a gin man myself, but I like to have a variety of spirits on hand. I stocked my cart with Sailor Jerry's Dark Rum, New Amsterdam Gin, St. Germain, Espolon Tequila, and a bottle of Bulleit Bourbon. I stocked my wine rack with a few bottles of red wine and made sure to have enough glassware to host a small gathering.

    created at: 04/16/2013

    In order to really make your bar cart stand out, you will also want to put a few choice items on the shelves. Dress it up with some other garage sale finds or special mementos from around your house. Then sit back and pour yourself a drink. Cheers!

    created at: 04/29/2013


    0 0

    created at: 04/24/2013

    Mirror mirror on the wall, who's the coolest of them all? Well, you of course.

    Er, yikes... sorry about that one. But! This simple idea really will transform your - otherwise boring - full-length mirror into a legit accent piece, and it's super easy to pull off.

    Taking into consideration that you already own a full-length mirror (if you don't, there are many affordable options out there), you'll only need a few supplies for this project:

    • A can of your favorite neon color
    • A paintbrush
    • Old newspapers

    Get it done: cover your work area with newspaper. Paint your mirror's trimming with neon goodness. Let it dry. Boom! That's it. Place it in your hallway or bedroom and earn mad cred.

    If you really want to make the whole thing from scratch; you could get a frameless mirror, add a trim of your liking (or even use some reclaimed wood boards), and follow the same steps mentioned above.

    TIP: Wanna go even more minimal? Paint it all white!

    [Image: Annvil]


    0 0
  • 04/30/13--11:00: The Art of Fixing Things
  • Look, I'm no handyman. Sure, I'm pretty comfortable around power tools, but if you ask me to look under your sink or which staircases need a handrail according to code, I'ma just Google it with the best of 'em. 

    And that's kinda lame, I'm thinking. Cause, if I'm for real about this whole "you should make stuff cause it'll better your life" thing, I reckon learning some basic maintenance is on the books.

    Enter The Art of Fixing Things, which I just ordered. It looks like an interesting mix of tips and techniques, and some hacks, and general good knowledge. Maybe a reference for keeping around. I'll let you know how it goes. 

    The Art of Fixing Things - 10.49 at Amazon 

     

     


    0 0

    created at: 04/30/2013

    Summer is fast approaching and, after long hibernation, you are working your butt off to get in shape. Protein smoothies? Check! Workout plan? Check! Cool gym bag?

    Um, no? Worry not, friend. In this roundup you'll find fit different bags that will fit your budget and personal style.You may think that having a nice gym bag is overrated, but have you thought of those times when you have to meet people right after work and you have no time to drop off your stuff at home? You don't want some old clunker adding up to the agony of carrying around a bunch of sweaty clothes, right?

     

    created at: 04/26/2013

    1: The Kevlar Gear Bag $245 Nice and sturdy. Designed to carry a bunch of hammers or a pair of running shoes. Features: waterproof canvas and tensile strength of 10,000 lbs. Bottom line, it's made to last.

    created at: 04/26/2013

    2: New Balance X Herschel Supply Co. $89. Affordable and stylish. This duffle bag is the result of collaboration of two popular brands, New Balance and Herschel. The design is quite sleek, so you don't have to worry of being too flashy. It comes with a secret compartment where you can store your shoes!

    created at: 04/26/2013

    3: The Jimbag $59.67. "Smart, attractive and stylish" - this goodie will be your partner in crime through tough times at the gym and fun times at the pub. Fits any style and looks quite dapper.

    created at: 04/26/2013

    4: Haven Shop $735 CAD. Got a bigger budget? Then try this one. It has lots - and by lots we mean plenty - of pockets that will help you keep your grooming supplies nice and organized. This is more of a tote-style bag, which looks less like a gym sack (inconspicuously in shape!).

    created at: 04/26/2013

    5: Genuine Goods  $115. Go retro with this 100% handmade, naturally dyed, camel leather weekender/duffle bag. A bit more rustic than the others above, but still stylish enough to carry around all day long. This bag will definitely give you extra bad-ass points for being vintage and masculine. Just sayin'

    So, are you going to upgrade your style?


    0 0

    Each Wednesday, I post some of my favorite can't-miss links, images, and otherwise mindblowing goodies from across the web. 

    Russian blogger and photographer Lusika33 ventured inside an active volcano complex to capture these amazing lava flows and otherwise terrifying, fiery goodness.  

    This is a real place, that you can go to. My training begins now. See more incredible images at My Modern Met. 

     

    Oh, and speaking of terrifying, fiery goodness: NASA made of video of the sun - three years in three minutes. 

     

    The National Will Play Same Song For Six Hours at MoMA, Because Art Also, that guy and I went to the same high school. #almamaterdropper 

     

     

    Evil People Live in Modernist Houses in Popular Films 

     

    scrape:falseVintage craft-y GIfs are the best GIFs. via @AvgJaneCrafter 

     

     

     


    0 0

    The Perfect Michelada

    Tastes like sunshine and feels like an ocean breeze. What is it? An all-inclusive vacation?

    Nope. It’s a Michelada, a mouth-watering beer cocktail that's perfect for the weekend (or any sunny day, really). Today, I'm sharing my go-to recipe to make a classic Michelada. Start chilling your Coronas!

    A Michelada is a Mexican beer cocktail that is both fresh and spicy. It tastes heavenly on a hot summer day and people drink them often as a cure for a nasty hangover (I have tried my fair share and I can testify that yes, they do work!). I guess they are the equivalent of a Caesar to Canada or a Bloody Mary to the US.

    There are many variations of this cocktail, so don't get stuck with the usual ingredients -- add your own twist to it! A few ideas: add pickled green beans, a slice of chorizo (yep, like a meal in a glass), or for those daredevils out there - add a habanero!

    Classic Michelada

    Here’s the recipe for a classic Michelada:

    Ingredients:

    • 1 Beer (Corona, Sol, Pacifico, or Negra Modelo are great options!)
    • 2 Limes (1 for rimming, 1 for the mix)
    • Salt
    • Tabasco sauce
    • Worcestershire sauce
    • 1 Tall glass

    Method:

    Rim glass with lime juice and salt. For the mix: add a few dashes of Tabasco and Worcestershire sauce (easy on the last one, or it'll taste like a steak). Add juice of 1 lime. Pour beer slowly into the mix. Sit, relax, and enjoy.

    Classic Michelada

    So easy and so amazingly fresh. Having this cocktail while relaxing on your patio feels like taking a vacation -- and you don't even have to leave your house!

    Micheladas go really well with shrimp cocktails, grilled fish, and burgers. If this cocktail is too spicy for you, try making a 'Chelada' which is the exact same thing, minus the sauces.

    Michelada

    If you end up making some crazy mixes, let me know! I'm always eager to find new variations.

    Salud!

     

     

     


    0 0

    created at: 05/02/2013

    So...how was your weekend? Mine? Fantastic. I was fortunate to spend it in New York City, at the "Color with Confidence" Event from Pantone, Valspar, and Lowe's. It was organized to celebrate the release of a new line of PANTONE UNIVERSE paint collection at Lowe's, which means...

    You can now get paint in Pantone colors at your local home improvement center. Design nerds rejoice! 

    created at: 05/02/2013

    The event was a two-day cocktail party and DIY challenge. On Friday evening, we gathered in an amazing loft in the Flatiron/Union Square area to meet with all kinds of cool people, from professional interior and fashion designers, magazine editors, the Pantone team, and other DIY bloggers. Then, on Saturday, we headed to the Hell's Kitchen Flea Market and the biggest Salvation Army I've ever seen to snag some cool pieces, and give them a bright, colorful makeover using the new PANTONE UNIVERSE paints from Lowe's own paint line, Valspar.

    created at: 05/02/2013

    Here's an Instagram photo that my friend and Curbly colleague Capree snapped of me working on my piece, which she dubbed "the mandelabra" 

    scrape:falseGIF by Natalie of A Dose of the Delightful

    As you can see, I was the only guy there, which always makes for good times. But seriously - this was super fun. I get invited to a lot of these events, but this one was a no-brainer: Pantone is cool, Lowe's is cool, the designers were cool, and I got to spend some amazing time with all kinds of awesome people, some of whom I expect will turn into real, life-long friendships. Can't beat that. 

    So, thank you Pantone, Lowe's, Valspar, and all the cool kids that made this happen. I was honored to participate.

     


    0 0

    Animation is nothing more than arranging relatively stable things, taking a picture, and then moving and doing it again, frame by frame. Some artists use pen and ink, some clay, some real world objects. This creative team of IBM researchers decided to use atoms. Atoms!? A. toms.   

    Hyperallergic reports,

    The world is obsessed with the “biggest” or “smallest” of anything, so … this work of nano-cinema holds the Guinness World Records record for the “World’s Smallest Stop-Motion Film.” Created by IBM, this film is made with atoms, yes, atoms, and “IBM researchers used a scanning tunneling microscope to move thousands of carbon monoxide molecules (two atoms stacked on top of each other), all in pursuit of making a movie so small it can be seen only when you magnify it 100 million times.”

    To learn more about how it was done, check out this making-of featurette:

    Learn more at HyperAllergic 

     


    0 0

    created at: 04/24/2013

    This isn't an art installation or a new site for the next Olympics. It's a kindergarten in the heart of one of the largest cities in China. Yes. A kinder-freaking-garten. Take a peek! This building makes The Jetsons' home look like a camping tent.

    Situated in Tianjin, China - LOOP is a 45,000 (!) square foot colorful kindergarten that hosts students from all over the world (Tianjin is full of Fortune 500 companies). Aside from being the coolest looking school on planet earth - LOOP uses creative, immersive, and interactive methods to teach students different subjects in both, English and Chinese. 

    created at: 04/24/2013

    The list of amenities is probably as lengthy as their admissions records, but there are a few that stand out: a beautifully trimmed courtyard right in front of the classrooms, ceilings painted with 18 different colours, and a spacious top floor with plenty of natural light that allows kids to play inside whenever the weather gets crappy.

    *sigh* If you ask me, this is the equivalent of the Batcave for kindergartens. Totally jealous.

    LOOP International Kindergarten, Tianjin [Images: Sako Architects

     


    0 0

    created at: 05/02/2013

    Of course, you know how to shave. Me too. But this interactive graphic from the team at Men's Health provides lots of interesting tips for a variety of facial/scalp hair combos. Particularly, there are some nice "rule of thumb"-style ideas to commit to memory to help you or a buddy have your best beard (or not).created at: 05/02/2013

    So, if you're currently bearded but considering taking things smooth for the summer, or vice versa, or anything in between... it's your face. Like everything, take care of it, and do things well. 

    Be sure to click over to the "tips and tricks" section. That's where the best goodies lies.

    Shaving 101: A Definitive Guide to Shaving and Facial Hair [Men's Health Grooming] 

     

     


    0 0

    Menswear Style

    Wearing camouflage is one of those things that you need to know how to do well, or you’ll look like a bad 90’s throwback picture. Fortunately, there are a few sartorialists out there that can help you get the look.

    In this How To Wear Camouflage post by Menswear Style, you can learn some solid tips to about this trend that has taken the streets by surprise. Camouflage adds really interesting and unexpected texture to your everyday look, plus, it gives you a badass edge that people totally dig.

    Check out the list of garments at the end of their post, they have some pretty rad pieces that will certainly enhance your sleek-commando look (including this awesome JCrew's special edition sweatshirt). Give it a go!

    How To Wear Camouflage 


    0 0

    created at: 05/06/2013Graphic designer and media-maker Ben Barrett-Forest made this excellent animated video detailing the history of typography. It's plenty educational, and all kinds of fun to watch:    

    Ben says it was crafted using 291 paper letters and 2,454 individual photographs. Awesome job.

    See more of Ben's work at his design site:Forrest Media

     

     


older | 1 | 2 | 3 | (Page 4) | 5 | 6 | .... | 122 | newer